This bug is an invasive grasshopper perched on a purple flower. Spiders, Centipedes, toads, birds, and small mammals eat them. Some grasshoppers eat toxic plants to prevent predators from eating them. Grasshoppers that eat toxins show bright colors to warn their predators that they taste bad.
The taro plant (or kalo in Hawaiian), Colocasia esculenta, is often grown near rivers due to its dependency on water. Kalo is traditionally (but not always) grown in lo'i, or taro patches. In Hawaii, Ancient Hawaiians ate taro as their main starch staple, which is why Hawaiians value water so much.
The Ti leaf, Cordyline Fruticosa, grows well in areas associated with irrigation. Making its way from Polynesia, the Ti leaves were used as rain capes, sandals and hula skirts, thatches for houses, plates, and more in ancient Hawaii.
We were unable to identify the exact species of this type of fern, but we do know that it is part of the genus Nephrolepsis. It is not native, but it's considered naturalized, which means it's established itself here. It was found among a bunch of other vines and ferns near the stream, signifying its low maintenance.
The ground layer, terra firma, is an important asset to the biodiversity of the rainforest. Decomposing fallen leaves, branches, and trunks can be homes for worms, larvae, and various creepy crawlies that enrich the soil.
This stream is called ‘Aihualama stream, it is a freshwater (rainwater) stream that is a major component of the watershed. The trade winds, clouds, and mountains cause the water to flow straight from the mountain down to the ocean.
The Harold L. Lyon Arboretum is located in a zone of tropical rainforest with an annual rainfall average of 13 feet in Manoa Valley. The site played an important role in agriculture and served as a source of water.
Did you know that the arboretum is nearly 200 acres? One way to get involved is to become a volunteer and serve the rainforest up-keeping through educational programs, visitor services, plant propagation, and research. Visit (https://manoa.hawaii.edu/lyonarboretum/get-involved/become-a-volunteer/) to make a difference
Created by: Dane, Royce, Maya, Katelin Iolani School Marine Bio - January 24, 2017
www.thinglink.com (1) Waikiki Watershed Project - by Iolani School...
We couldn't identify this particular plant, but we do know that the area is filled with many native and non native plants.
Did you know that the arboretum is nearly 200 acres? One way to get involved is to become a volunteer and serve the rainforest up-keeping through educational programs, visitor services, plant propagation, and research. Visit (https://manoa.hawaii.edu/lyonarboretum/get-involved/become-a-volunteer/) to make a difference