Social Studies Assessment Profile
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<div>We utilized the Historical Categories of Inquiry as ways to organize our content based learning targets. Students should be able to connect any content based topic to one of these categories.</div>
<div>By using these categories across grade levels and in different content areas, students will see connections in a spiraled and sequenced curriculum and also have a common language for discussion and analysis.</div>
<div>Change and Continuity offers a great way to look at historical content with a broader lens and allows analysis across units of study.</div>
<div>Many of our content targets fall in this category. For example, "I can assess the arguments for American involvement in World War I."</div>
<div>In my mind, this is the most important category - making everything relevant. </div>
<div>Perspective plays an important role in the category, and it also an great avenue for incorporating primary sources.</div>
<div>The 4 "Cs" of 21st Century Learning were an easy choice for our skills categories. While we have always incorporated these into student learning and activity, this provides a great structure for students.</div>
<div>Preparing 21st Century Students for a Global Society</div> www.nea.org
<div>As a department, we created a guiding document to provide students with an outline of the process necessary to succeed as a social studies student. This "Successful Social Studies Rubric" became the source for our process targets, and we have students use these for self assessment.</div>
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">An example - America's Story - Process Targets</span></div><div><br></div> docs.google.com America's Story - Process Targets
<div>This category allows students to see events, ideas, and movements as turning points instead of unrelated events on a timeline. </div>

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