Steam Engine: Energy for the Industrial Revolution- Alyssa F
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">James Watt was an engineer and inventor who greatly improved the steam engine by creating a more efficient model. He not only used the engine to power factories, but improve transportation.</span></div>
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">The steam engine operates on the principle that the force of steam propelled from high to low pressure areas can be used to produce power. During the Industrial Revolution, water was commonly heated by coal in a container that is sealed with the exception of a pump. The steam is attracted to areas of lower pressure, it escapes the high-pressure area of the container through the pump. The steam is then forced through the cylinder, which produces power.</span></div>
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">The first steam engines were very helpful to generate power, but they still had many ways to improve. James Watt developed an model operated a piston enclosed in a cylinder, which worked as a pump by expanding and condensing steam. His steam engine was very successful and widely used.</span></div> www.youtube.com
<div><b><span style="font-size:16px;">Effect of the Steam Engine: </span></b><span style="font-size:16px;">The steam engine was a revolutionary invention for industry. Unlike water power, steam power could be used where ever coal was located. This enabled more factories to be built and increased textile production. Mines were no longer flooded by water, so mining became more productive and the availability of coal, copper, iron and tin. The increase in these metals helped fuel other industries.</span></div>
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">The people were in great need of energy to power their factories. They had relied on power from animals and water mills. But for power to be generated in this way, the factories needed to be located by a water source. Also, as factories grew in size, they required more power that couldn't be reached through water. Steam engines grew in popularity for powering factories because of these restrictions.</span></div>

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