Intervention Central has many strategies for behavior mod...
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Intervention Central has many strategies for behavior modification</span></div><div><br></div> www.interventioncentral.com Behavioral Intervention is a leading strategy to help educators increase classroom productivity by helping with behavior modification
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Behavior Advisor - lots of great tips on managing student behavior.</span></div><div><br></div> www.behavioradvisor.com Lots of great tips on managing student behavior. World's most popular behavior/behaviour management site.
<div>1. Always restate expectations</div><div>2. Try simple things first</div><div>3. Don’t overreact</div><div>4. Don’t overdo it</div><div>5. Offer choices</div><div>6. Call for backup</div> classroomcaboodle.com Student defiance could be the worst immediate behavior that can happen, aside from safety issues. How to handle it without emotion.
<div>Allow the Student a 'Cool-Down' Break (Long, Morse, &amp; Newman, 1980). </div><div><br></div><div>Select a corner of the room (or area outside the classroom with adult supervision) where the target student can take a brief 'respite break' whenever he or she feels angry or upset. Be sure to make cool-down breaks available to all students in the classroom, to avoid singling out only those children with anger-control issues. Whenever a student becomes upset and defiant, offer to talk the situation over with that student once he or she has calmed down and then direct the student to the cool-down corner. </div><div><br></div><div>"Thomas, I want to talk with you about what is upsetting you, but first you need to calm down. Take five minutes in the cool-down corner and then come over to my desk so we can talk."</div> www.interventioncentral.com
<div>Do Not Get Entangled in Arguments (Walker &amp; Walker, 1991). </div><div><br></div><div>The careful teacher avoids being dragged into arguments or unnecessary discussion when disciplining students. When you must deliver a command to, confront, or discipline a student who is defiant or confrontational, be careful not to get 'hooked' into a discussion or argument with that student. If you find yourself being drawn into an exchange with the student (e.g., raising your voice, reprimanding the student), immediately use strategies to disengage yourself (e.g., by moving away from the student, repeating your request in a business-like tone of voice, imposing a pre-determined consequence for noncompliance).</div> www.interventioncentral.com
<div>Keep Responses Calm, Brief, and Businesslike (Mayer, 2000; Sprick, Borgmeier, &amp; Nolet, 2002). </div><div><br></div><div>Because teacher sarcasm or lengthy negative reprimands can trigger defiant student behavior, instructors should respond to the student in a 'neutral', business-like, calm voice. Also, keep responses brief when addressing the non-compliant student. Short teacher responses give the defiant student less control over the interaction and can also prevent instructors from inadvertently 'rewarding' misbehaving students with lots of negative adult attention.</div> www.interventioncentral.com
<div>Selectively ignore inappropriate behavior.</div><div><br></div><div>It is sometimes helpful for teachers to selectively ignore inappropriate behavior. This technique is particularly useful when the behavior is unintentional or unlikely to recur or is intended solely to gain the attention of teachers or classmates without disrupting the classroom or interfering with the learning of others.</div> www.educationworld.com This ten-part guide outlines a series of instructional strategies that have proven to be successful in educating children with ADHD. The three main components of a successful strategy for educating children with ADHD are academic instruction, behavioral interventions, and classroom accommodations. By incorporating techniques from these three areas into their everyday instructional and classroom management practices, teachers will be empowered to improve both the academic performance and the behavior of their students with ADHD. In doing so, teachers will create an enhanced learning environment for all students.
<div>Provide calming manipulatives.</div><div><br></div><div>While some toys and other objects can be distracting for both the students with ADHD and peers in the classroom, some children with ADHD can benefit from having access to objects that can be manipulated quietly. Manipulatives may help children gain some needed sensory input while still attending to the lesson.</div> www.educationworld.com This ten-part guide outlines a series of instructional strategies that have proven to be successful in educating children with ADHD. The three main components of a successful strategy for educating children with ADHD are academic instruction, behavioral interventions, and classroom accommodations. By incorporating techniques from these three areas into their everyday instructional and classroom management practices, teachers will be empowered to improve both the academic performance and the behavior of their students with ADHD. In doing so, teachers will create an enhanced learning environment for all students.
<div>Allow for "escape valve" outlets.</div><div><br></div><div>Permitting students with ADHD to leave class for a moment, perhaps on an errand (such as returning a book to the library), can be an effective means of settling them down and allowing them to return to the room ready to concentrate.</div> www.educationworld.com This ten-part guide outlines a series of instructional strategies that have proven to be successful in educating children with ADHD. The three main components of a successful strategy for educating children with ADHD are academic instruction, behavioral interventions, and classroom accommodations. By incorporating techniques from these three areas into their everyday instructional and classroom management practices, teachers will be empowered to improve both the academic performance and the behavior of their students with ADHD. In doing so, teachers will create an enhanced learning environment for all students.
<div>Proximity control.</div><div>When talking to a child, move to where the child is standing or sitting. Your physical proximity to the child will help the child to focus and pay attention to what you are saying.</div> www.educationworld.com This ten-part guide outlines a series of instructional strategies that have proven to be successful in educating children with ADHD. The three main components of a successful strategy for educating children with ADHD are academic instruction, behavioral interventions, and classroom accommodations. By incorporating techniques from these three areas into their everyday instructional and classroom management practices, teachers will be empowered to improve both the academic performance and the behavior of their students with ADHD. In doing so, teachers will create an enhanced learning environment for all students.
<div>Hyperactive students tend to have a very high energy level, act impulsively and can be behaviorally distracting. They may fidget, play with objects, tap pencils so loudly against their desk that kids from across the room look over at them, or blurt out answers to teacher questions before the instructor is even finished asking them. When working with students who are hyperactive or impulsive, teachers should keep in mind that these students are very often completely unaware that others view their behavior as distracting or annoying. Teachers working with such children can greatly increase their own effectiveness by clearly communicating behavioral expectations to students, by encouraging and rewarding students who behave appropriately, and by being consistent and fair when responding to problem student behaviors. Here are teacher ideas for managing impulsive or hyperactive students who display problem motor or verbal behaviors:</div> www.interventioncentral.com
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Dealing with Difficult Students--What to do When Nothing Works</span></div><div><br></div><div> If you think I have the answers here, I'm afraid you'll be disappointed. I'm far from having any answers. I'm not superhuman--none of us...</div><div><br></div> www.leahcleary.com Resources and inspiration for secondary educators
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">At a Glance: Classroom Accommodations for ADHD</span></div><div><br></div><div>What types of accommodations can help students with ADD and ADHD? Here are some classroom accommodations to talk over with your child's school.</div><div><br></div> www.understood.org What types of accommodations can help students with ADD and ADHD? Here are some classroom accommodations to talk over with your child&#39;s school.
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Motivate Defiant and Disruptive Students to Learn</span></div><div><br></div> womenconnectonline.com Tweet Pin It
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">How To Motivate Unmotivated Students | Smart Classroom Management</span></div><div><br></div> www.smartclassroommanagement.com You praise. You encourage. You pep-talk, demand, and implore. But nothing seems to change. Trying and failing to motivate unmotivated students is a common frustration among teachers. It’s a frustration with seemingly no real answers beyond the same old, same old. Until today. Because I’m going to share with you a reliable way to begin …
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Smart Classroom Management</span></div><div><br></div> www.smartclassroommanagement.com Smart Classroom Management
<div>Capture Students' Attention Before Giving Directions (Ford, Olmi, Edwards, &amp; Tingstrom, 2001; Martens &amp; Kelly, 1993). </div><div><br></div><div>Gain the student's attention before giving directions and use other strategies to ensure the student's full understanding of them. When giving directions to an individual student, call the student by name and establish eye contact before providing the directions. When giving directions to the whole class, use group alerting cues such as 'Eyes and ears on me!' to gain the class's attention. Wait until all students are looking at you and ready to listen before giving directions. When you have finished giving directions to the entire class, privately approach any students who appear to need assistance. Quietly restate the directions to them and have them repeat the directions back to you as a check for understanding.</div> www.interventioncentral.com
<div>Give Opportunities for Choice (Martens &amp; Kelly, 1993; Powell &amp; Nelson, 1997).</div><div><br></div><div> Allowing students to exercise some degree of choice in their instructional activities can boost attention span and increase academic engagement. Make a list of 'choice' options that you are comfortable offering students during typical learning activities. During independent seatwork, for example, you might routinely let students choose where they sit, allow them to work alone or in small groups, or give them 2 or 3 different choices of assignment selected to be roughly equivalent in difficulty and learning objectives.</div> www.interventioncentral.com
<div>Select Activities That Require Active Student Responding (Gettinger &amp; Seibert, 2002; Heward, 1994).</div><div><br></div><div>When students are actively engaged in an activity, they are more likely to be on-task. Avoid long stretches of instructional time in which students sit passively listening to a speaker. Instead, program your instructional activities so that students must frequently 'show what they know' through some kind of active [visible] response. For example, you might first demonstrate a learning strategy to students and then divide the class into pairs and have students demonstrate the strategy to each other while you observe and evaluate.</div> www.interventioncentral.com
<div>Make the Activity Stimulating (U.S. Department of Education, 2004).</div><div><br></div><div>Students require less conscious effort to remain on-task when they are engaged in high-interest activities. Make instruction more interesting by choosing a specific lesson topic that you know will appeal to students (e.g., sports, fashion). Or help students to see a valuable 'real-word' pay-off for learning the material being taught. Another tactic is to make your method of instruction more stimulating. Students who don't learn well in traditional lecture format may show higher rates of engagement when interacting with peers (cooperative learning) or when allowed the autonomy and self-pacing of computer-delivered instruction.</div> www.interventioncentral.com
<div>Students who have chronic difficulties paying attention in class face the risk of poor grades and even school failure. Inattention may be a symptom of an underlying condition such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. However, teachers should not overlook other possible explanations for student off-task behavior. It may be, for example, that a student who does not seem to be paying attention is actually mismatched to instruction (the work is too hard or too easy) or preoccupied by anxious thoughts. Or the student may be off-task because the teacher's lesson was poorly planned or presented in a disorganized manner. It is also important to remember that even children with ADHD are influenced by factors in their classroom setting and that these students' level of attention is at least partly determined by the learning environment. Teachers who focus on making their instruction orderly, predictable, and highly motivating find that they can generally hold the attention of most of their students most of the time. Here are some ideas to consider to boost rates of student attending and on-task behavior:</div> www.interventioncentral.com
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">How to keep from giving up on apathetic students</span></div><div><br></div><div>You can’t lose sleep over disengaged students, but you can’t give up on them, either. In this episode, I’ll share how to overcome the feeling of powerlessness that comes from working with unmotivated students, and break free from the trap of trying to nag and shame them into working harder. Learn where to focus…</div><div><br></div> thecornerstoneforteachers.com You can’t lose sleep over disengaged students, but you can’t give up on them, either. In this episode, I’ll share how to overcome the feeling of powerlessness that comes from working with unmotivated students, and break free from the trap of trying to nag and shame them into working harder. Learn where to focus your …
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">5 Questions to Ask Yourself About Your Unmotivated Students</span></div><div><br></div><div>If we know what works to motivate students, why are so many students still unmotivated? These five questions will help you determine if your practice is really in line with research. Continue Reading →</div><div><br></div> www.cultofpedagogy.com If we know what works to motivate students, why are so many students still unmotivated? These five questions will help you determine if your practice is really in line with research. Continue Reading →
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Motivating the Unmotivated - The Owl Teacher</span></div><div><br></div><div>Our first reaction with students who are unmotivated is frustration and annoyance. It’s easy to think about just throwing that student out of our room so we don’t have to deal with him or her. We have brilliant lesson plans and creative presentations ready and a student who threatens that… Continue Reading »</div><div><br></div> www.theowlteacher.com Our first reaction with students who are unmotivated is frustration and annoyance.  It’s easy to think about just throwing that student out of our room so we don’t have to deal with him or her.  We have brilliant lesson plans and creative presentations ready and a student who threatens that… Continue Reading »
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Strategies For Non Motivated</span></div><div><br></div> behavioradvisor.com StrategiesForNonMotivated
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Bouncy Balls</span></div><div><br></div><div>Make all kinds of bouncy balls react to sounds from your microphone. A great sound/noise monitor for classrooms and a fun way to visualize music.</div><div><br></div> bouncyballs.org Make all kinds of bouncy balls react to sounds from your microphone. A great sound/noise monitor for classrooms and a fun way to visualize music.
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Learn all about ClassDojo ♥</span></div><div><br></div><div>Build wonderful classroom communities with parents and students</div><div><br></div> classdojo.com Build wonderful classroom communities with parents and students
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Classroom Management</span></div><div>Tracey's Classroom Management Pinterest Resource Board</div><div><br></div> www.pinterest.com Find and save recipes, parenting hacks, style inspiration and other ideas to try.

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