<div>Mushrooms are a multicellular organism. They are multicellular because they have more than one cell and they have organs and systems. A human's organs are on the inside, but mushrooms organs are grown on the outside.</div> visual.merriam-webster.com
<div>Mushrooms go through sexual reproduction. The cap of the mushroom produces millions of single celled spores. When the spores are released, they are carried by the wind and will eventually land on another mushroom. After the spore lands on the mushroom, the spore will grow hyphae, then mycelium, and finally the stalk of a new mushroom.</div> farm7.staticflickr.com
<div>Mushroom development begins with spores that send out threads called hyphae. Once multiple hyphae have fused together, they form mycelium. Eventually the mycelium will form a hyphal knot which is the beginning part of the mushroom you see above ground. The mushroom will then begin to grow its stem, fruiting body, and gills.</div>
<div>Mushrooms go through homeostasis. Since they do not have skin, they lose water very easily. This is why mushrooms need to live in wet climates. If the they do not get enough water, then the cap of the mushrooms closes and shrinks to lock in moisture. </div> media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com
<div>Mushrooms respond to stimuli. Mushrooms know when they are hungry. They also know when prey, such as nematodes, are close so they can trap it using different methods. </div> blog.insureandgo.com
<div>Mushrooms get their energy from the soil and decaying matter around them. This can be bark, leaves, or even old feathers. Hyphae breaks all of this down and turns it into energy for the mushroom.</div>
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">Mushroom Growing Time Lapse</span></div><div><br></div><div>Mushroom Growing Time Lapse</div><div>(watch from 0:25 - 0:55)</div><div><br></div> www.youtube.com YouTube
<div><span style="font-size:16px;">An introduction to backyard fungi</span></div><div><br></div> www.backyardnature.net An introduction to backyard fungi