<div>There are seven stages within the basic LTAD model:</div><div>Stage 1: Active Start (0-6 years)Stage 2: FUNdamentals (girls 6-8, boys 6-9)Stage 3: Learn to Train (girls 8-11, boys 9-12)Stage 4: Train to Train (girls 11-15, boys 12-16)Stage 5: Train to Compete (girls 15-21, boys 16-23)Stage 6: Train to Win (girls 18+, boys 19+)</div><div>Stage 7: Active for Life (any age participant)</div>
<div>Stages 1, 2 and 3 develop physical literacy before puberty so children have the basic skills to be active for life. Physical literacy also provides the foundation for those who choose to pursue elite training in one sport or activity after age 12. </div><div>Stages 4, 5 and 6 provide elite training for those who want to specialize in one sport and compete at the highest level, maximizing the physical, mental and emotional development of each athlete.</div><div>Stage 7 is about staying Active for Life through lifelong participation in competitive or recreational sport or physical activity.</div>
<div>Long–Term Athlete Development is a structured pathway that follows CS4L principles to optimize the development of our athletes at all ages and stages of their development. LTAD is a training, competition and recovery pathway based on developmental age–the maturational level of an individual – rather than chronological age.</div><div>To promote each child's healthy and logical development in a sport or physical activity, LTAD identifies sequential stages for training and competition that respects their physical, mental, and emotional development. </div>
<div>it has this stages under it 1 active start</div><div>2 fundamental</div><div>3 learning to train </div><div>4 training to train</div><div>5 training to compete</div><div>6 training to win</div><div>7 active for life</div>
<div>canadiansportforlife.ca/learn-about-canadian-sport-life/itad-stages</div><div><br></div><div>www.talismacenhtre.com&gt;...&lt;LTDA(long-term athlete development</div>