<div>Find out more information &gt;&gt;</div> global.oup.com This fourth edition of the Oxford Textbook of Clinical Nephrology builds on the success and international reputation of the publication as an important resource for the practising clinician in the field.
<div><a href="http://oxfordmedicine.com/view/10.1093/med/9780199592548.001.0001/med-9780199592548-chapter-3">Read chapter 3 -- presentations of renal disease</a></div> oxfordmedicine.com Presentations of renal disease - Oxford Medicine
<div><a href="http://oxfordmedicine.com/view/10.1093/med/9780199592548.001.0001/med-9780199592548-chapter-266">Read chapter 266 -- Peritoneal dialysis: non-infectious complications</a></div> oxfordmedicine.com Peritoneal dialysisnon-infectious complications - Oxford Medicine
<div><a href="http://oxfordmedicine.com/view/10.1093/med/9780199592548.001.0001/med-9780199592548-chapter-283">Read chapter 283 -- Rejection</a></div> oxfordmedicine.com Rejection - Oxford Medicine
<div><a href="http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780191784125.do">How to subscribe &gt;&gt;</a></div><div><br></div><div>The textbook is available on a 12 month online-only subscription. The online version has the full and comprehensive text of the hardback book, with the added convenience and flexibility of a digital book. You can search and bookmark to find information quickly, annotate the text, export citations easily, as well as enlarge and download hundreds of images.</div> global.oup.com This fourth edition of the Oxford Textbook of Clinical Nephrology builds on the success and international reputation of the publication as an important resource for the practising clinician in the field. It provides practical, scholarly, and evidence-based coverage of the full spectrum of clinical nephrology, written by a global faculty of experts.
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<div><a href="http://blog.oup.com/2016/02/perils-of-salt/">The perils of salt</a></div><div><br></div><div>The Amazonian Yanomami people famously manage on only 50 mg (1 mmol) of sodium chloride per day, while in more developed societies, we struggle to keep our average intake below 100 times that level.</div> blog.oup.com The Amazonian Yanomami Indians famously manage on only 50 mg (1 mmol) of sodium chloride per day, while in more developed societies, we struggle to keep our average intake below 100 times that level.
<div><a href="http://blog.oup.com/2016/01/dialysis-hepatitis/">Dialysis and hepatitis</a></div><div><br></div><div>When dialysis was first developed, it was billed as a major life-saving treatment. But after a 1969 hepatitis outbreak began at a Manchester renal unit, expansion slowed as dialysis became feared.</div> blog.oup.com From about 1964, there was increasing excitement that dialysis might become a major life-saving treatment for chronic renal failure, not just for acute renal failure. Transplantation was also in its infancy, but despite some promise, overall success rates at this time were very poor.
<div><a href="http://blog.oup.com/2016/02/nils-alwall-dialysis-machine/">Nils Alwall: The quiet, unassuming Swede</a></div><div><br></div><div>Back in 1946, Nils Alwall developed a strange machine for passing blood through an eleven-metre long sausage casing – a process now called dialysis.</div> blog.oup.com During the night, between 3rd and 4th September 1946, things were stirring in the basement of the internal medicine department, at the university hospital of Lund, Southern Sweden. A 47-year-old man had been admitted for treatment. His main problem was uraemia (urea in the blood), but he was also suffering from silicosis (a lung disorder), complicated by pneumonia.
<div><a href="http://blog.oup.com/2015/12/willem-kolff-dialysis/">Willem Kolff’s remarkable achievement</a></div><div><br></div><div>Willem Kolff put the theory of therapeutic dialysis into successful practice in the most unlikely circumstances: Kampen, in the occupied Netherlands during World War II.</div> blog.oup.com Willem Kolff is famously the man who first put the developing theory of therapeutic dialysis into successful practice in the most unlikely circumstances: Kampen, in the occupied Netherlands during World War II. Influenced by a patient he had seen die in 1938, and in a remote hospital to avoid Nazi sympathisers put in charge in Groningen, he undertook experiments with cellulose tubing and chemicals and then went straight on to make a machine to treat patients from 1943.