Active for Autism is our training programme available for sports coaches and physical activity leaders. <b>Click to find out more.</b> www.autism.org.uk Autism, sport and physical activity practice training course for PE teachers, sports coaches, club leaders and all other sport professionals.
<i>Classroom and playground </i>is our guidebook for working with younger children on the autism spectrum. <b>Click to buy or download.</b> www.autism.org.uk Classroom and playground - NAS
<div>Free time such as lunchtime and break time may be difficult for pupils on the autism spectrum. In our short guide, we explain why and suggest some ways in which school staff and other pupils can help. <b>Click to download.</b></div> www.autism.org.uk Understanding difficulties at breaktime and lunchtime for pupils with an autistic spectrum disorder - NAS
&quot;I don&apos;t feel that I&apos;m concealed at all to be something I&apos;m not, I can just be a free individual, that&apos;s the vibe I get from the school. I don&apos;t have any regrets at all. I can live as positively as I like.&quot; - Christopher Harris, student with autism featured in <i>Educating the East End</i> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
At my old school, I got bullied a lot, and I didn’t have many friends. Changes can make me anxious, and meeting new people is sometimes hard, but this school has helped me with that a lot. I feel more special than I did at my old school, because people understand me.<br /> - Ffion Morgan, Thames Valley School student
Children with autism can have difficulty processing everyday sensory information such as sounds, sights and smells. This is usually called having sensory integration difficulties, or sensory sensitivity. It can have a profound effect on their time in school – simple things like the lighting and the smells from the kitchen could lead to a meltdown.
Transition from primary to secondary school can be difficult. We have a detailed guide about managing that change. <b>Click to read.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
&quot;As a teacher supporting children with autism, you have to be more flexible. Children with autism sometimes find it difficult to manage their emotions and get themselves in a state ready for learning. Being in a classroom can also be hard for them, so I’ve taught Maths in a tree, English in the den and Art on the playground! You need to be wherever the child is comfortable and ready to learn.&quot; - Rod Fox, teacher at Thames Valley School
Lunchtime and playtime are difficult for many pupils on the autism spectrum in mainstream schools. Unstructured time can provoke anxiety as children may not be sure what to do, or how to participate in games and activities. The noise and bustle of a playground can also be very intimidating for children on the autism spectrum. <i>Classroom and playground </i>is a short booklet with some advice for teachers with little experience of working with children on the autism spectrum.<i> </i> <b>Click to find out more.</b> www.autism.org.uk Classroom and playground - NAS
<h3>Children with autism can have difficulty processing everyday sensory information such as sounds, sights and smells. This is usually called having sensory integration difficulties, or sensory sensitivity. It can have a profound effect on their time in nursery – simple things like the lighting and the smells from the kitchen could be the cause of huge anxiety that can lead to meltdowns. <b>Click to watch. </b></h3><b></b> youtu.be The National Autistic Society's amazing film on sensory sensitivity. *Please note: this film is intended to simulate sensory overload and so features loud, r...
At Woodlands, we have a sensory room which is a safe environment for the children. The changes it has made are absolutely drastic. It is used for soft play, to help the children develop their motor skills, and it is also used for behaviour management. If a child is upset, they have a place to go, where there are no demands on them and no expectations. They can just sit and take in the lights and the calmness, and recover from the overstimulation that they may be feeling from the day. - Emma Addison, Woodlands ASD Resource Base, Netley Primary
The Circle of Friends approach is often used to assist children with an ASD to develop their social and communication skills, as this is an area in which they will often have difficulties. As Howlin (1998) states, one of the most difficult and demanding tasks for children with autism is learning how to interact appropriately with children of their own age. <b>Click to find out more. </b> www.autism.org.uk Classroom - NAS
Dining rooms can be particularly challenging places for children who are sensitive to lots of noise, crowding and smells. What&apos;s more some children with autism have special dietary needs. <b>Click to find out more about restricted diets.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
When you can change the resources, the children can really engage with their learning. www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
Sometimes I wear headphones at school, especially if everyone’s being naughty, because I don’t like loud noises. - Jamian, student at Thames Valley School
<b></b>If you are a sports instructor or leader of an organised activity group, you may be asked to include a child with autism in your class or group. <b></b><b>Click to read a guide to support their needs.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
Exams are a time of high anxiety for all pupils, but especially those with autism. Our short guide about exams is aimed at parents and teachers of secondary school-aged pupils. The guide has advice on planning revision and study leave; making special arrangements for pupils with an ASD; and some practical ways to prepare for exams. <b>Click to find out more.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
Written by highly experienced teachers for staff in mainstream secondary schools, <i>Autism in the secondary classroom</i> contains practical information, advice and resources to improve your provision for pupils with autism. www.autism.org.uk Autism in the secondary classroom - NAS
Written by highly experienced teachers for staff in mainstream primary schools, Autism in the primary classroom contains practical information, advice and resources to improve your provision for pupils with autism. www.autism.org.uk Autism in the primary classroom - NAS
<b></b>If you have a young child in your class who is displaying the symptoms of autism (whether or not they have received a formal diagnosis), <b>click to read a guide</b> that explains more about the condition and suggests some strategies for helping them in nursery and preschool.<b></b> www.autism.org.uk This guide about very young children on the autism spectrum autism covers topics such as communication, eating, toileting, play and obsessions.
Practical advice for setting up play schemes for children with autism spectrum disorders. Author Sandra Thomas discusses the details of planning play schemes and how they can encourage play, social interaction and learning. <b>Click to buy. </b> www.autism.org.uk Playscheme resource manual - NAS
Written for professionals with limited experience either of child protection, or working with children with autism, <i>Safeguarding children with autism</i> identifies the key principles of safeguarding and clearly outlines the steps that need to be taken when there are concerns.<br />This is available as a free ebook. www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
“School is one of the most important things in life – you have to go to school, even if you miss your parents. I do lessons that are really good for me, and I like playing with my friends because I have lots of friends.” - Ijaz, student at Netley Primary School
&quot;I&apos;ve always thought in life that if someone&apos;s wellbeing is looked after, everything else follows automatically. &quot; - Ayesha Choudhury, teaching assistant at Frederick Bremer School. <b>Click to read Ayesha and Christopher&apos;s case study.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
<b>Join MyWorld today to get the latest news on teaching children with autism.</b> www.autism.org.uk Sign up to MyWorld - free autism teaching resources - NAS
It&apos;s not easy for women and girls with autism. They&apos;re underdiagnosed and don&apos;t receive the right support. On 29 September, we&apos;re holding a conference in Falkirk, Scotland to discuss the right approaches. <b>Click to find out more.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
<b>Join MyWorld to get free fortnightly emails packed with tips and resources.</b> www.autism.org.uk Sign up to MyWorld - free autism teaching resources - NAS
Active for Autism is our training programme available for sports coaches and physical activity leaders. <b>Click to find out more.</b> www.autism.org.uk Autism, sport and physical activity practice training course for PE teachers, sports coaches, club leaders and all other sport professionals.
<h3>How can teachers support children with autism? We&apos;re asking teachers to step into their pupil&apos;s world.</h3> www.youtube.com How teachers can support children with autism - YouTube
Prevent challenging behaviour in the classroom by focusing on reducing stress and anxiety. Our conference on 10 November will show off the latest research and best practice. <b>Click to find out more.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
<h3>Teaching children with autism to use the toilet properly can be a challenge. Dr Eve Fleming goes through common issues and offers some solutions.</h3> www.youtube.com Autism and Education Conference, 12th December 2013. 'Helping autistic children use the toilet: strategies for continence difficulties' - Eve Fleming
<h3><b></b>Children with autism are excluded more frequently than children without autism. Steven Monnery looks at alternatives to exclusion.<b></b></h3><b></b> www.youtube.com Autism and Education Conference, 12th December 2013. 'Exclusions: examining the alternatives and best practice if there are none' - Steven Monnery
<h3>When a child on the autism spectrum is in the classroom, you&apos;ll have to teach a little differently. Yvonne Vining and Michelle Davis look at how to adapt your teaching style.</h3> www.youtube.com Adapting your teaching style for children with ASD - Yvonne Vining and Michelle Davies - YouTube
<h3>Children with autism aren&apos;t problems, they&apos;re individuals. Rita Jordan discusses how to see children with autism for who they are.</h3> www.youtube.com Seeing all young people as individuals - Professor Rita Jordan - YouTube
&quot;Ari is 13 and is in his second year at Oak Lodge. While his chattiness and keenness to talk sets him apart from some of his peers, it disguises the hidden challenges that he faces each day. &quot; <b>Click to read Ari&apos;s case study as part of the MyWorld campaign.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
www.autism.org.uk Sign up to MyWorld - free autism teaching resources - NAS
www.autism.org.uk Sign up to MyWorld - free autism teaching resources - NAS
If your school is providing an excellent environment for students with autism, you could become an accredited provider. The Autism Accreditation award provides a seal of quality and can give people peace of mind when choosing a nursery or school. www.autism.org.uk Our Autism Accreditation programme provides an autism-specific quality assurance programme for hundreds of organisations throughout the UK and across the world.
If your school is providing an excellent environment for students with autism, you could become an accredited provider. The Autism Accreditation award provides a seal of quality and can give people peace of mind when choosing a nursery or school. www.autism.org.uk Our Autism Accreditation programme provides an autism-specific quality assurance programme for hundreds of organisations throughout the UK and across the world.
If your school is providing an excellent environment for students with autism, you could become an accredited provider. The Autism Accreditation award provides a seal of quality and can give people peace of mind when choosing a nursery or school. www.autism.org.uk Our Autism Accreditation programme provides an autism-specific quality assurance programme for hundreds of organisations throughout the UK and across the world.
We offer a one-day course about continence problems in children on the autism spectrum. <b>Click to find out more. </b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
<div>We offer a one-day course about continence problems in children with autism. <b>Click to find out more. </b></div> www.autism.org.uk This one-day course will focus on common toileting difficulties and specific autism-related continence issues. For anyone working with children with autism but particularly relevant for continence advisers, nursing teams and school-based staff or advisers.
We offer a one-day course about continence problems in children with autism. <b>Click to find out more. </b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
Sensory issues can impair communication, as it all becomes too much. We offer a one-day workshop with renowned autism expert Dr Wenn Lawson on communication and sensory issues. <b>Click to find out more.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
We offer a one-day combined course where sports practitioners, such as coaches, can find out more about autism and tailor their delivery of sport to people on the autism spectrum. <b>Click to find out more.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
What&apos;s PDA? How is it diagnosed? What are some strategies to use in educating a child with PDA? Our one-day conference goes in depth with one of the hottest topics in the autism community. <b>Click to find out more.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
<div>What's PDA? How is it diagnosed? What are some strategies to use in educating a child with PDA? <b>Click to find out more.</b></div> www.autism.org.uk Pathological demand avoidance (PDA) is part of the autism spectrum. Learn how to get a diagnosis and read guidelines for families and professionals.
www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS
What&apos;s PDA? How is it diagnosed? What are some strategies to use in educating a child with PDA? Our one-day conference goes in depth with one of the hottest topics in the autism community.<br /><b>Click to find out more.</b> www.autism.org.uk 404 - NAS