Los Tejanos: A Plaza in Texas in the 1930s
What clues in the painting give you an idea of the time period during which this scene took place?
According to Spanish tradition, the plaza was the starting point of a new town and served as the social center of the community.
Traditionally, the plaza was the site of <i>paseos</i>, or promenades, as well as vendors, musical performances, and <i>ferias</i>, or fairs.
Tejano cultural traditions are reflected throughout Texas. In architecture, music, and art, you can see and hear Tejano influence all around you!
What kinds of activities do you see people taking part in?
What kinds of vendors do you see represented here at the plaza?
Spanish influence on architecture can be seen in this wrought iron railing on the bandstand!
Notice how the artist focuses on clothing and textile details.
Spanish jump rope rhyme: Osito, osito, ¿puedes saltar? Ayúdame, ayúdame a contar 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10… Translation: Little bear, little bear, can you jump? Help me, help me to count. 1,2,….
Artists use study photographs as references for their work. The artist used this 1920 photo of David Cisneros from San Antonio on a horse as a reference.
Artists use study photographs as references for their work. The artist used this photo of Rafaela Escobedo, paper flower vendor, selling flowers on W. Commerce St., in San Antonio in 1945 as a study reference.
Artists use study photographs as references for their work. The artist used this snapshot of Padre Pedro Plaza in San Diego Texas as a reference. The plaza was named in honor of Father John Pierre Bard, who was popularly known as Padre Pedro.

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