www.theoi.com In Greek mythology Charon was the ferryman of the dead who transported the ghosts of the dead across the river Acheron to Hades. He was depicted as an ugly, bearded man with a crooked nose, wearing a conical hat and tunic.
www.theoi.com CERBERUS : Three-headed guard dog of Hades, labor Heracles ; Greek mythology ; pictures : KERBEROS
www.theoi.com In ancient Greek mythology and religion Elysium was the final resting place of the souls of heroes and virtuous men. The ancients often distinguished two Elysian realms--the islands of the Blessed and the Lethean fields of Hades. The first of these--also known as the White Island or the Islands of the Blessed--was an afterlife realm reserved for the heroes of myth. It was a paradise located in the far western stream of the river Oceanus ruled by the Titan-King Cronus or Rhadamanthys, son of Zeus. The second Elysium was an underworld realm separated from the gloom of Hades by the river Lethe. Its pleasant fields were promised as an afterlife to initiates of the Mysteries who had lived virtuous lives.
www.theoi.com Tartarus was the great pit beneath the earth in the oldest cosmogonies of ancient Greek mythology. The universe was envisaged as great sphere--or egg-shaped ovoid--with the solid dome of the sky forming the upper half and the inverse dome of the pit of Tartaros the lower. The flat, horizontal disc of the earth divided the interior of the cosmic sphere into two halves--the homes of men and gods above, and the gloomy, storm-wracked prison of the Titans below.
www.theoi.com Hades was the ancient Greek king of the underworld and god of the dead. He was depicted as a dark-bearded, regal god either enthroned in the underworld and holding a sceptre, or pouring fertility from a cornucopia. His Roman name was Pluto.
www.theoi.com Erebus was the primordial god of darkness and the consort of Nyx (Night). His dark mists encircled the world and filled the deep hollows of the earth. In the evening, Erebos' wife Nyx drew Erebos' darkness across the sky bringing night and his daughter Hemera scattered it at dawn bringing day--the first obscuring Aether, the heavenly light of the ether, the second revealing it.
www.theoi.com In Greek mythology the Domos Haidou (House of Hades) was the land of the dead--the final resting place for departed souls. It was a dark and dismal realm where bodiless ghosts flitted across the grey fields of asphodel. The Homeric poets knew of no Elysian Fields or Tartarean Hell, rather all shades--heroes and villians alike--came to rest in the gloom of Haides.

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