The purposes of the South Carolina book awards are to encourage our students to read good quality contemporary literature and to honor the authors of the books annually chosen the favorites by student vote. The book award medals will be awarded to the winning authors the following year at the South Carolina Association of School Librarians annual conference
SC Young Adult Book Awards www.scasl.net
The 5th Wave Book Trailer www.youtube.com ON SALE NOW! www.The5thWaveIsComing.com The Passage meets Ender's Game in an epic new series from award-winning author Rick Yancey. After the 1st wave, only ...
After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.Now, it's the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth's last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie's only hope for rescuing her brother--or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.
Robyn Schneider's The Beginning of Everything is a witty and heart-wrenching teen novel that will appeal to fans of books by John Green and Ned Vizzini, novels such as The Perks of Being a Wallflower, and classics like The Great Gatsby and The Catcher in the Rye.Varsity tennis captain, Ezra Faulkner, was supposed to be homecoming king, but that was before—before his girlfriend cheated on him, before a car accident shattered his leg, and before he fell in love with unpredictable new girl Cassidy Thorpe.As Kirkus Reviews said in a starred review, "Schneider takes familiar stereotypes and infuses them with plenty of depth. Here are teens who could easily trade barbs and double entendres with the characters that fill John Green's novels. "Funny, smart, and including everything from flash mobs to blanket forts to a poodle who just might be the reincarnation of Jay Gatsby, The Beginning of Everything is a refreshing contemporary twist on the classic coming-of-age novel—a heart-wrenching story about how difficult it is to play the part that people expect, and how new beginnings can stem from abrupt and tragic endings.
Listen to author, Robyn Schneider, read the first chapter of THE BEGINNING OF EVERYTHING. www.youtube.com In which we have STORYTIME and I read you chapter one of my forthcoming YA novel Severed Heads, Broken Hearts (out in June from HarperCollins in the US and S...
BOY NOBODY by Allen Zadoff Book Trailer www.youtube.com http://www.bookmovies.tv/en/book/boy-nobody Boy Nobody is the perennial new kid in school, the one few notice and nobody thinks much about. He shows u...
Full-Text Review:Booklist June 1, 2013 (Vol. 109, No. 19) Grades 8-12. Boy Nobody is a coldly dispassionate teenage assassin working for a mysterious organization called the Program. When it assigns him his next mission—to assassinate the mayor of New York—it seems at first like business as usual. But then he meets Sam, the mayor’s beautiful daughter. Suddenly, his mission is abruptly changed, and all bets are off. The formerly obedient Boy Nobody begins asking questions that are dangerous to his mission and to himself. Readers may question that a teenager is capable of playing the role assigned to Boy Nobody, but books like these require a suspension of disbelief, and most readers will be willing to make that suspension for the sake of the fast-paced plot and the surprisingly sympathetic protagonist. Operating in the tradition of both James Bond and of Robert Cormier’s I Am the Cheese (1977), Boy Nobody is an auspicious first volume in a promised new series of action-adventure thrillers that will keep readers clamoring for more.
Full-Text Review:Booklist May 15, 2013 (Vol. 109, No. 18) Grades 8-11. It’s 1867, and bright, modern, 17-year-old Verity Boone knows she will miss bustling, urban Worcester when she leaves it for her birthplace—the quiet farm town of Catawissa. Still, she looks forward to meeting her fiancé, Nate, and to her reunion with her father. Catawissa and its inhabitants, however, are not as she anticipated. Her cold, distant father finds every excuse not to spend time with her, and her outings with Nate are awkward and nothing at all like the warm, romantic letters he courted her with. Then, there are the mysterious graves of her mother and aunt, set in cages outside Catawissa’s church. As Verity learns more about her father, her fiancé, and the town’s troubled history, angry elements from the past shove her headlong into mortal danger. Salerni’s immensely readable novel is based on the author’s discovery of two real caged graves in Catawissa, Pennsylvania. Hand this fast-paced, creepy tale to fans of mysteries, forensics, paranormal and historical fiction, and the CSI TV series.
THE CAGED GRAVES book Trailer www.youtube.com Book trailer for The Caged Graves by Dianne K. Salerni
Full-Text Review for FIND ME by :Booklist October 15, 2013 (Vol. 110, No. 4) Grades 9-12. When a dead girl’s diary is left on 16-year-old Wick’s doorstep, she decides to use her skills as a hacker to investigate. It turns out that the girl committed suicide after her involvement with a pedophile, whose attentions drove her to the fatal act. Things then get personal when it appears that Wick’s younger sister, Lily, is the pedophile’s next target. Meanwhile, Wick’s brutal, drug-dealing father, who is on the run from police, appears and is determined to involve his daughter in a computer scam. How will Wick handle all of this? Will her growing friendship with her computer lab partner, Griff, help? Yes, there is a lot going on in Bernard’s suspenseful first novel. Although the subplot about Wick’s father veers dangerously close to the gratuitous, Bernard still manages to keep a successful handle on her disparate story lines, maintaining the fast-paced, nail-biting action of this compulsively readable mystery, which will have readers on the edge of their seats. Clearly, Bernard’s debut is an auspicious one that will leave readers hungry for more.
FIND ME by Romily Bernard Book Trailer www.youtube.com FIND ME is the thrilling debut novel from Romily Bernard. "Find me." These are the words written on Tessa Waye's diary. The diary that ends up with Wick T...
Full-Text Review of THE IMPOSSIBLE KNIFE OF MEMORY by Laurie Halse AndersonBooklist starred November 15, 2013 (Vol. 110, No. 6) Grades 9-12. There’s a compelling theme running through Anderson’s powerful, timely novel, and it’s this: The difference between forgetting something and not remembering is big enough to drive an eighteen-wheeler through. Hayley Kincaid won’t allow herself to remember the happy times in her life, and why should she? After five years on the road with her trucker father, Andy, the two are finally staying put in her grandmother’s old house in upstate New York. But military tours in both Iraq and Afghanistan have left Andy racked by nightmares of gunfire and roadside bombs, and alcohol and drugs are his means of coping. Short, gripping chapters presented in italics appear on occasion and are told from Andy’s point-of-view as the war rages around him. As her father’s PTSD grows worse, and the past is ever present, 17-year-old Hayley assumes the role of parent. But there’s a good part of her life, too: Finn. He’s got dreams for his future, and, as Hayley lets him in to her own scary reality, she tentatively begins to imagine a future of her own. Unfortunately—or fortunately—memories have a way of catching up, and as each hits, it cuts away at Hayley’s protective bubble like a knife. This is challenging material, but in Anderson’s skilled hands, readers will find a light shining on the shadowy reality of living with someone who has lived through war—and who is still at war with himself.
THE IMPOSSIBLE KNIFE OF MEMORY by Laurie Halse Anderson Book Trailer www.youtube.com For the past five years, Hayley Kincaid and her father, Andy, have been on the road, never staying long in one place as he struggles to escape the demons tha...
Full-Text Review of IN THE SHADOW OF BLACKBIRDS by Cat Winters Booklist starred April 15, 2013 (Vol. 109, No. 16) Grades 9-12. Winters’ debut ropes in the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, WWI shell shock, national prejudice, and spirit photography, and yet never loses focus from its primary thesis: desperation will make people believe—and do—almost anything. Mary Shelley Black, 16, has been sent to live with her aunt in San Diego, a city crawling with gauze mask–wearing citizens fearful of catching the deadly virus. Loss is everywhere, which means booming business for spirit photographer Julius, the older brother of Mary’s true love, Stephen, who is off fighting in the trenches. Stephen’s death coincides with Mary suffering electrocution, an event with strange aftereffects: Mary sends compass needles spinning, can taste emotions, and begins to see and hear Stephen’s ghost, in torment over the maniacal “birdmen” that tortured and killed him. Mary believes his spirit will rest when she uncovers the truth about his death—a truth more horrifying than most readers will expect. A scattering of period photos, including eerie examples of spirit photography, further the sense of time and place, but the main event here is Winters’ unconventional and unflinching look at one of the darkest patches of American history. More than anything, this is a story of the breaking point between sanity and madness, delivered in a straightforward and welcoming teen voice.
IN THE SHADOW OF BLACKBIRDS by Cat Winters Book Trailer www.youtube.com YouTube
Full-Text Review of INVISIBILITY by Andrea Cremer and David LevithanBooklist May 1, 2013 (Vol. 109, No. 17) Grades 9-12. Since birth Stephen has been invisible—the result, perhaps, of an arcane curse. “I am like a ghost who’s never died,” he thinks wistfully. And like a ghost, he remains unseen until the day he encounters the abrasive Elizabeth, newly moved to New York from Minnesota. “She sees me,” he thinks, amazed. And yes, the two fall in love. But what about that curse? How is it that Elizabeth is the only one who can see him? It must mean something, but what? And, most important, can the curse be broken? Questions abound in this enigmatic mash-up of fantasy and romance set in contemporary real-world Manhattan. If there are sometimes too many coincidences and plot conveniences, the collaboration of Levithan and Cremer creates a seamless narrative that, after a slow start, picks up appreciably as answers begin to emerge right up to the equivocal ending that suggests a sequel. And that’s good news for the many readers who will be left eagerly waiting for the story to continue. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: With two New York Times best-selling authors behind it, this title will almost sell itself, but a major marketing push has already generated anticipation well beyond the collaborators’ already vast fan base.
INVISIBILITY by Andrea Cremer and David Levithan Book Trailer www.youtube.com ON SALE MAY 7, 2013 Stephen is used to invisibility. He was born that way. Invisible. Cursed. Elizabeth sometimes wishes for invisibility. When you're invi...
Full-Text Review of KINDNESS for WEAKNESS by Shawn Goodman Booklist August 2013 (Online) Grades 8-12. When 15-year-old James dutifully attempts to deliver drugs for his older brother, whom he idolizes, he is caught by police, convicted, and sentenced to a year in juvenile prison. In the novel that follows, Goodman offers a searing indictment of the so-called juvenile justice system, in which any attempt at kindness is perceived as weakness. Goodman is notably successful at stirring up a visceral reaction from the reader at the flagrant injustices that James encounters, and he does an interesting thing by contrasting James’ experiences with those of Humphrey Van Weyden, the protagonist of Jack London’s classic novel The Sea Wolf (1904). Will James, who perceives himself as “a skinny, friendless loser,” be able to transform himself, or will his bête noire, the system itself, prove to be his undoing? James’ first-person voice tends to be uneven and lacks authenticity, but, once again, the story it tells is a powerful one, though its ending, which seems to contradict much that has gone before, is bound to leave readers wondering.
KINDNESS for WEAKNESS by Shawn Goodman Book Trailer www.youtube.com book trailer I made for a reading class (i own nothing from this trailer. images are from google and the music i got from itunes)
Full-Text Review of LIFE AFTER THEFT by Aprilynne PikeBooklist February 15, 2013 (Vol. 109, No. 12) Grades 8-11.Jeff and his family have just moved from Phoenix to Santa Monica, where he now attends a posh private school haunted by a ghost only he can see: Kimberlee Schaffer, once Whitestone Academy’s queen bee. Jeff learns that Kimberlee, who drowned more than a year ago, was a serious kleptomaniac who had stolen from virtually every student and teacher at the school, as well as exclusive, expensive stores. Her ghost is unable to move on because she wants to return the stolen goods to their owners—but ghosts can’t physically move objects. So Jeff becomes her Scarlet Pimpernel, packaging and returning the items with a special “I’m sorry” sticker on them. In the process, he wins the love of beautiful Sera (herself battling image problems) and discovers that wealth can’t buy happiness. The plot may be predictable, but the snippy arguments between Kimberlee and Jeff capture authentic teen voices. Furthermore, Jeff’s journey to real empathy takes on issues crucial and relevant to teens: the price of popularity, the importance of being true to one’s beliefs, and the need to stand up for others.
Full-Text Review of LIVING WITH JACKIE CHAN by Johanna KnowlesBooklist September 1, 2013 (Vol. 110, No. 1) Grades 9-12.Last seen in Jumping Off Swings (2009), Josh, who accidentally got Ellie pregnant when he was 16, is struggling deeply with the aftermath of his actions. Trying to escape his guilt, Josh moves in with his Jackie Chan–obsessed, karate-instructor uncle, Larry, hoping to just keep his head down, finish high school, get into college, and forget his mistakes. Larry has other plans, though, and quickly recruits him to assist his karate classes. As he spends his days with his irrepressibly cheerful Zen master of an uncle—eating healthy food; not drinking; practicing karate; and befriending Stella, the beautiful girl upstairs—he learns how to be a “true karate man,” epitomizing the values of leadership, strength, and honor, all of which help him accept his past and take responsibility for his mistakes. Knowles compassionately depicts the consequences of teen pregnancy from the boy’s perspective, and Josh’s journey—aided in no small part by the kind (and perky) wisdom of his uncle—is touching and honest. Josh’s anger, sadness, and regret are palpable, but his ultimate steps forward are quietly triumphant.
Full-Text Review of NOGGIN by John Corey Whaley Booklist starred November 1, 2013 (Vol. 110, No. 5) Grades 9-12.Travis Coates has lost his head—literally. As he dies from acute lymphoblastic leukemia, his head is surgically removed and cryogenically frozen. Five years pass, and, thanks to advances in medical science, it becomes possible to reanimate his head and attach it to a donor body. Travis Coates is alive again, but while his family and friends are all 5 years older, Travis hasn’t aged—he is still 16 and a sophomore in high school. Awkward? Difficult? Puzzling? You bet. In the past, the two people he could have talked to about this were his best friend, Kyle, and his girlfriend, Cate. But now they’re part of the problem. Kyle, who came out to Travis on his deathbed, has gone back into the closet, and Cate is engaged to be married. Stubbornly, Travis vows to reverse these developments by coaxing Kyle out of the closet and persuading Cate to fall in love with him again. How this plays out is the substance of this wonderfully original, character-driven second novel. Whaley has written a tour de force of imagination and empathy, creating a boy for whom past, present, and future come together in an implied invitation to readers to wonder about the very nature of being. A sui generis novel of ideas, Noggin demands much of its readers, but it offers them equally rich rewards. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Whaley’s sleeper debut, Where Things Come Back (2011), won both the Michael L. Printz Award and the William C. Morris Award, so readers will be eagerly awaiting this second effort.
Full-Text Review of NOGGIN by John Corey Whaley Booklist starred November 1, 2013 (Vol. 110, No. 5) Grades 9-12.Travis Coates has lost his head—literally. As he dies from acute lymphoblastic leukemia, his head is surgically removed and cryogenically frozen. Five years pass, and, thanks to advances in medical science, it becomes possible to reanimate his head and attach it to a donor body. Travis Coates is alive again, but while his family and friends are all 5 years older, Travis hasn’t aged—he is still 16 and a sophomore in high school. Awkward? Difficult? Puzzling? You bet. In the past, the two people he could have talked to about this were his best friend, Kyle, and his girlfriend, Cate. But now they’re part of the problem. Kyle, who came out to Travis on his deathbed, has gone back into the closet, and Cate is engaged to be married. Stubbornly, Travis vows to reverse these developments by coaxing Kyle out of the closet and persuading Cate to fall in love with him again. How this plays out is the substance of this wonderfully original, character-driven second novel. Whaley has written a tour de force of imagination and empathy, creating a boy for whom past, present, and future come together in an implied invitation to readers to wonder about the very nature of being. A sui generis novel of ideas, Noggin demands much of its readers, but it offers them equally rich rewards. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Whaley’s sleeper debut, Where Things Come Back (2011), won both the Michael L. Printz Award and the William C. Morris Award, so readers will be eagerly awaiting this second effort.
Full-Text Review of PALACE OF SPIES by Sarah ZettelBooklist November 1, 2013 (Vol. 110, No. 5) Grades 8-12.Sixteen-year-old Peggy Fitzroy is an orphan, raised by her aunt and uncle in 1700s London. She is smart, charming, feisty, and unwilling to accept the repulsive and immoral suitor chosen for her. Angered by her refusal, her uncle throws her out. Homeless, Peggy agrees to disguise herself as a lady-in-waiting at the court of King George I, taking the name and identity of Lady Francesca Wallingham, recently deceased from supposedly natural causes. In this fashion, Peggy becomes a spy and finds herself involved in multiple mysterious and perhaps nefarious intrigues, all while falling in love with the handsome and gentlemanly artist Matthew. Zettel has created a dynamic, immensely likable heroine in Peggy, and she folds in plentiful history, both cultural and political. Clever chapter headings give a tongue-in-cheek taste of the nonstop action. Historical fiction readers will love the detailed clothing descriptions, and romantics will bask in the comfortably predictable pattern of Peggy and Matthew’s relationship. A sequel is in the works, and it will be eagerly anticipated by fans of Libba Bray.
Full-Text Review of REVENGE OF A NOT SO PRETTY GIRL by Carolita Blythe Booklist August 2013 (Online) Grades 6-9. If beauty is on the inside, Faye certainly doesn’t have much going for her at the start of this book, set in Brooklyn in the mid-1980s. She and her friends rob an elderly woman who they believe was once a movie star. During the robbery, Faye accidentally injures Evelyn quite severely. Haunted by guilt, and desperate to find a way to escape her mother’s abusive home as much as she can, Faye returns to the apartment to check on Evelyn, and the two develop the most unlikely of friendships. This is a classic coming-of-age story wherein Faye must face her own burden of responsibility and break free from the detrimental expectations of others. Peppered with ’80s pop-culture references, but otherwise untethered to the era, the book sometimes feels dated instead of retro. But Faye’s personal growth and her eventual escape from a dark home life are rewarding, as is the quirky friendship between Faye and Evelyn, from which Faye learns much about responsibility and individuality.
Full-Text Review of SPIRIT AND DUST by Rosemary Clement-MooreBooklist May 15, 2013 (Vol. 109, No. 18) Grades 9-12. We first met the Goodnight family in Texas Gothic (2011), wherein college freshman Amy (Amaryllis) used her powers of seeing ghosts to solve mysteries. Now we travel from Texas to Minnesota with Amy’s cousin Daisy, who shares her cousin’s gift and has been recruited by the FBI to help solve a brutal murder and kidnapping. The Scooby-Doo mystery flavor of the first title continues, with Cleopatra’s feisty spirit acting up in a museum chase scene, and fashion details and romantic clinches everywhere. Clement-Moore delivers some lovely comic zingers in a romance that manages to lightly poke fun at the genre it solidly inhabits
Full-Text Review of STEELHEART by Brandon SandersonBooklist starred September 1, 2013 (Vol. 110, No. 1) Grades 8-12.From the day eight-year-old David Charleston watched Steelheart gun down his father, he has vowed revenge. All Epics are powerful—Steelheart the most invincible of all—but each has a weakness, and David thinks he has found Steelheart’s: he has seen him bleed. Now 10 years later, with this experience and years of studying each Epic’s patterns and weaknesses, David worms his way into the Reckoners, a courageous group determined to take down Epics in an attempt to return the Fractured States to some semblance of normalcy. Sanderson has written a riveting dystopian adventure novel replete with awesome tech tools: pen detonators, gauss guns, gravitronic motorcycles, mobiles (smart phones on steroids), and tensor gloves to tunnel through steel. Each Reckoner has his or her own talents: Tia, research and planning; Cody, intelligent grunt work and comic relief; Abraham, weapons and ammunition; and Prof, leader and prime inventor-scientist. Oh, and there’s Megan, new girl with an attitude—especially when it comes to David’s relentless pressure on the Reckoners to stay in Newcago and kill Steelheart. Snappy dialogue, bizarre plot twists, high-intensity action, and a touch of mystery and romance—it’s a formula that sucks readers into the prologue, slings them through one tension-filled encounter after another, and then, at the strange and marginally hopeful conclusion, leaves them panting for the sequel, Firefight, due in 2014. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: A multiplatform marketing campaign, with promotions happening every month in 2013 leading up to the pub date, has already kicked into high gear for New York Times best-selling Sanderson’s latest.
Full-Text Review of THIS IS WHAT HAPPY LOOKS LIKE by Jennifer E. SmithBooklist April 1, 2013 (Vol. 109, No. 15) Grades 8-11.When “GDL” gets an e-mail address wrong, the surprise recipient, “EONeill,” decides to reply. The two develop a deep and intimate rapport despite guarding their true identities. But down-to-earth movie star Graham Larkin is certain that Ellie is someone special, and he lobbies to shoot his new movie in “the middle of nowhere, Maine,” Ellie’s hometown. Ellie is shocked to learn who Graham is, and she is anything but thrilled by the prospect of dating a teen heartthrob. Meanwhile, the paparazzi trailing Graham threaten to upturn the quiet, carefully constructed life Ellie and her mother have nurtured to smooth over a high-profile secret. The shared third-person narration lends a quiet insight into these two likable characters whose histories and flaws are relatable and fully fleshed out. The blend of celebrity glitz and small-town coziness gives this summer love story a pleasant frame, and it will leave readers wishing for more time with this endearing couple as the sun rises on their last morning together.
Full-Text Review of THE TYRANT"S DAUGHTER by J.C. CarlesonBooklist February 1, 2014 (Vol. 110, No. 11) Grades 9-12. Removed from her unnamed Middle Eastern country after her father is murdered during a coup, 15-year-old Laila is now living near Washington D. C. with her mother and brother. In addition to navigating an American high school, Laila tries to act as guardian to her younger brother, Bastien, now the King of Nowhere, and as her mother’s spy by getting close to Amir, a teenage boy from her country involved in the resistance. Laila is a strong narrator, expressing her feelings about American dress and social interactions in ways that will get readers thinking. Being raised in the palace, Laila was immune to many of the difficulties of life in her country and never saw her father as a dictator or harsh ruler, raising a very real question about the children of world leaders: Do they see their parents as the world sees them? This is more than just Laila’s story; rather, it is a story of context, beautifully written (by a former undercover CIA agent), and stirring in its questions and eloquent observations about our society and that of the Middle East.
Full-Text Review of WHEN YOU WERE HERE by Daisy WhitneyBooklist August 2013 (Online) Grades 10-12.Danny is exploding in small ways. He purposefully clips a parked car as he drives by. He ends his valedictorian speech by flipping the finger. Danny’s mother died of cancer two months earlier, after seeking treatments in Mexico, Greece, and Japan, promising she would make it to Danny’s graduation. Then Danny discovers that his mother had stopped taking her medications, apparently during the time she was being treated in Tokyo. What happened to her promise about making it to his graduation? Danny heads off to Japan, seeking to understand his mother’s final months, and to escape the alluring presence of his ex-girlfriend, Holland. Despite the sad topic, it’s refreshing to read a story centered on a boy’s love for his mother. As Danny learns about his mother’s transformative stay in Tokyo, Danny also discovers her secrets, including a big one about Holland. He is aided by the vivacious Kana, who declares that (despite appearances) she is not a Harajuku girl. With that fascinating city as a backdrop, Danny rediscovers his own passion for life. Pair this with Holly Thompson’s The Language Inside (2013).
LIFE AFTER DEATH by Aprilynne Pike Book Trailer www.youtube.com Disclaimer: I do not own any of these images or music but the end product is mine.
NOGGIN by John Corey Whaley Book Trailer www.youtube.com Learn more about Noggin at http://books.simonandschuster.com/Noggin/John-Corey-Whaley/9781442458727?mcd=vd_youtube_book Travis Coates has a good head…on some...
PALACE OF SPIES by Sarah Zettel Book Trailer www.youtube.com Sixteen-year-old Peggy Fitzroy is clever enough to fake her way into King George's court in London, but is she clever enough to survive in his Palace of Spie...
REVENGE OF A NOT SO PRETTY GIRL by Carolita Blythe Book Trailer www.youtube.com Check out the extended trailer for my new novel, "Revenge Of A Not So Pretty Girl," available in bookstores and on eBook. http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/c...
SPIRIT AND DUST by Rosemary Clement-Moore Book Trailer www.youtube.com Here are my quick thoughts on this fun book! For more on this book and others, check out my blog: www.beawesomebeabooknut.blogspot.com Facebook Page: https:...
STEELHEART by Brandon Sanderson Book Trailer www.youtube.com Ten years ago, Calamity came. It was a burst in the sky that gave ordinary people extraordinary powers. The awed public started calling them Epics. Epics are...
THIS IS WHAT HAPPY LOOKS LIKE by Jennifer E. Smith Book Trailer www.youtube.com A trailer of the wonderful writing of Jennifer E. Smith.
THE TYRANT'S DAUGHTER by J.C. Carleson Book Trailer www.youtube.com A book trailer on a Colorado Blue Spruce Nominee for 2016