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Dr. Sato, The Manzanar Project & The Mangrove Tree

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Art of Gaman americanart.si.edu The Art of Gaman / American Art
Manzanar Museum www.nps.gov
JAPANESE AMERICANS REDRESS BILL, H.R. 442, JUNE 1986: "In June 1986, leading legislators in the House and Senate are sought redress for the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II through enactment of the Civil Liberties Act of 1985 (H.R.442/S.1053). The proposed bill would implement the recommendations of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians which found that the exclusion and detention of Japanese Americans during World War II was based on racial prejudice, war hysteria and tile lack of political leadership - not military necessity. Specifically, H.R. 442 provides that: there be a formal apology by Congress and the President recognizing the grave injustices committed by the Federal Government against Japanese Americans, Congress establish an educational and humanitarian trust fund to educate the American people about the dangers of racial intolerance, and an individual compensation of $20,000 be paid to each surviving internee, in recognition of individual losses and damages." www.civilrights.org JAPANESE AMERICANS REDRESS BILL
Manzanar War Relocation Records www.oac.cdlib.org Manzanar War Relocation Center records, 1942-1946
Japenese American Internment Classroom Materials: "After the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans encountered strong hostility, prejudice, and discrimination. Fearing that Japan might next strike the West Coast of the United States and that Japanese Americans would "spy" for the enemy, Thousands of Japanese Americans living on the West coast were rounded up and confined to internment camps located inland. The following photos offer a view of what life was like for the Japanese Americans. In what ways do you think life changed for the Japanese Americans interned in the camps? How do you think those interned felt about the government of the United States? If you had been uprooted from your home and confined to a camp, how would you have felt? Click on the photographs for larger images. For additional images on this topic, consult FSA/OWI Photographs, 1935-1945, Taking the Long View, 1851-1991 [panoramic photographs], and Ansel Adams's Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar." www.loc.gov Japanese American Internment - American Memory Timeline- Classroom Presentation | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress
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