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An ancient Mesoamerican ball game court., Roman naval bat...

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An ancient Mesoamerican ball game court. www.flickr.com Explore t_feiler's photos on Flickr. t_feiler has uploaded 4581 photos to Flickr.
Roman naval battles would be held in colosseums such as this. www.flickr.com The Coliseum (Coloseum, Colosseum), was built during the reign of Emperor Vespasiano c. 72 AD and dedicated in 80 AD by his son Titus. The popular name of Coliseum came about because the immense oval stadium was situated next to a colossal statue of Nero. The original name of this ancient Roman sports arena, the largest arena of its kind, is The Amphitheatrum Flavium Over 64 metres high with eighty entrances, the Coliseum could hold upwards of 50,000 spectators. Public events such as gladiator fights, mock naval battles and wild animal hunts were held at the Coliseum. During the staged fights as many as 10,000 people were killed. Fighters were slaves, prisoners or volunteers. Spectators saw persecuted Christians killed by lions. After 404 AD gladiatorial battles were no longer held, but animals such as lions, elephants, snakes and panthers continued to be massacred in the name of sport until the 6th century. Mock naval battles were arranged by removing the heavy wooden flooring and flooding the lower cells, which usually housed the animals and prisoners. As gladiator fights proved to be more popular, the naval battles were ultimately moved to another site, and the wooden floors made permanent. During the middle ages, stones from the Coliseum were removed for new buildings. Today, in Rome, the Coliseum is one of its most famous landmarks and tourist attractions. Although it survives only as a ruin, it still rates as one of the finest examples of Roman architecture and engineering.
Depiction of Pankration-- the violent Greek version of MMA. www.flickr.com Explore c.finlay's photos on Flickr. c.finlay has uploaded 41 photos to Flickr.
Venatio- the Roman game of fighting elephants may not have looked too different than this "Lord of the Rings" scene/ www.flickr.com A still from "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King."
Fishermen's jousts still continue to this day, but people aren't allowed to be eaten by alligators like they used to be in ancient Egypt. www.flickr.com Explore Gastr0naut's photos on Flickr. Gastr0naut has uploaded 401 photos to Flickr.
Played for sacrificial purposes or for the sheer use of murder as entertainment, death was the final outcome for most competitors. www.flickr.com This is a detail of the building known as the "Tzompantli" in the Mayan ceremonial center of Chichen Itza. It is imagery like the one you see here where all the eurocentrists base their smear campaign against the Mesoamerican cultures, yes, the ones the Europeans destroyed while conducting the largest genocide in recorded history, an event that started out by the "discovery" of the American continent, same that continued during the colony. The Spaniards and then the Portuguese, the Dutch, the English and the French needed and excuse to explain their complete obliteration of entire civilizations, so they came up with something evil, they claimed that the Mayans, the Incas, the Mexica and pretty much any other culture in America practiced human sacrifices, not only that, but at large scale. The last example of that flat out lie was seen by millions of movie goers around the world courtesy of Mel Gibson's "Apocalypto". Nevermind there is not a single skull or skeleton to prove that human sacrifice was the everyday bread of Mesoamerican societies, the wide spread notion among those who visit the ceremonial centers is that it is almost impossible that those "human flesh eating savages" could build something so beautiful, some times they even get feedback from the own Mexican tour guides who describe gruesome methods to sacrifice vestal virgins and little toddlers. 500 hundred years of lies and deception, but there is those like myself who say enough of it, there was no human sacrifices among the American cultures. Those who choose to believe it should demand from the phony archaeologists that they come up with incontestable evidence to what they say. Just like it is a crime to deny the Nazi Holocaust, it should be a crime to insist on the human sacrifice dogma, a web of lies designed to minimize the genocide that took place in America. In that note, I take this opportunity to remind you about the voting process that may put Chichen Itza among the New Seven Wonders of the World, here you have the link: www.new7wonders.com/index.php .