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Main Ideas of Assessment

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Diagnostic Assessment: is conducted at the beginning of a topic to gauge the prior knowledge of students. It helps the teacher to tailor subsequent tasks and explanations to enhance the learning of students. www.education.nt.gov.au Curriculum resources, NTCET, NAPLAN, VET, students with disability, professional development, back to school payment.
Formative Assessment: is ongoing assessment aimed at providing feedback to the teacher about how the students understanding the subject is developing. It helps the teacher identify and correct misconceptions and judge the effectiveness of educational activities. www.cmu.edu Formative vs Summative Assessment - Enhancing Education - Carnegie Mellon University
Summative Assessment: is conducted at the end of a topic or subject to measure the level of success in which a student achieves designated learning outcomes. Summative assessment is normally formal and either graded or marked. www.cmu.edu Formative vs Summative Assessment - Enhancing Education - Carnegie Mellon University
Formal Assessments are structured and data driven. Examples of formal assessments include traditional pen-and-paper examinations, standardised tests and quizzes. They result in a mark or grade and are often summative in nature.
Informal assessments are content and performance driven rather than data driven. They result in feedback but not necessarily a grade or mark. Examples include workbooks, posters and debates.
Assessment practicality: concerns how practical the elements of the test are with respect to resources available including time, funding and how these relate to the program and the students. Doran, Lawrenz and Helgeson (1994, p 338-442).
Assessment Validity: determines whether the assessment matches the description given to students prior to the task. Doran, Lawrenz and Helgeson (1994, p 338-442).
"...Engaging and worthy problems or questions of importance, in which students must use knowledge to fashion performances effectively and creatively. The tasks are either replicas of or analogous to the kinds of problems faced by adult citizens and consumers or professionals in the field." (Wiggins, 1993, p. 229). jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu What is Authentic Assessment? (Authentic Assessment Toolbox)
Contrived assessments carry no significance to the students and are not engaging.
"Assessment for learning involves teachers using evidence about students' knowledge, understanding and skills to inform their teaching. Sometimes referred to as ‘formative assessment', it usually occurs throughout the teaching and learning process to clarify student learning and understanding." (http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/support-materials/assessment-for-as-and-of-learning/) syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au Throughout 2011 and 2012, the Board of Studies NSW developed new K–10 syllabuses for English, Mathematics, Science (incorporating Science and Technology K–6) and History that incorporate agreed Australian Curriculum content.
Assessment as learning: involves students becoming responsible for their own learning. They use assessment to determine what they do know and what they need to focus on. syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au Throughout 2011 and 2012, the Board of Studies NSW developed new K–10 syllabuses for English, Mathematics, Science (incorporating Science and Technology K–6) and History that incorporate agreed Australian Curriculum content.
Assessment of learning: assesses students ability to demonstrate outcomes. Summative assessment is assessment of learning. syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au Throughout 2011 and 2012, the Board of Studies NSW developed new K–10 syllabuses for English, Mathematics, Science (incorporating Science and Technology K–6) and History that incorporate agreed Australian Curriculum content.
Assessment Reliability: refers to the consistency of test conditions and results. Reliable assessments test students understanding fairly. Doran, Lawrenz and Helgeson (1994, p 338-442).
Assessment Impact: asks how the assessment will affect students, teachers and the community. Doran, Lawrenz and Helgeson (1994, p 338-442).