<div>Kaminarimon (Thunder Gate) 雷門 | Tokyo, Japan</div><div><br></div><div>When you enter the grounds of Sensoji Temple you’ll walk under Kaminarimon - Thunder Gate - and the huge red lantern that adorns it, past the guardian statues. Originally built in 941 Common Era it was moved to its current site at Asakusa, Tokyo. It was built by the military clan leader Taira no Kinmasa. Destroyed by fire in 1631, it was rebuilt in 1649 by Iemitsu Tokugawa. (Tokugawa Ieyasu’s grandson) The gate has four statues guarding the entrance to Sensoji. In the front on the east side (the left) is Fujin (風神), the God of Wind. To the west (the right) is Raijin (雷神), God of Thunder. In the back are the Buddhist god Tenryu to the east, and Buddhist goddess Kinryu to the west. Due to this, the back side is referred to ‘Furaijinmon’ (風雷神門) which is the official name of the gate. If you stroll through have a look at the bottom of the lantern for the inscription of this name.</div> www.youtube.com When you enter the grounds of Sensoji Temple you’ll walk under Kaminarimon - Thunder Gate - and the huge red lantern that adorns it, past the guardian statue...
<div>Nakamise-dori Shopping Street 仲見世通り(narrated by Rushton Hurley) | Tokyo, Japan</div><div><br></div><div>After you walk under Kaminarimon Gate there is a 200 meter stretch of shops along ‘Nakamise-dori’ (the middle road of shops). From the late 1600s, people visiting the temple could purchase toys, sweets, snacks, and souvenirs, much like today. During the Meiji Restoration (1867) the land was appropriated by the Tokyo government, but by the end of 1885 merchants were again allowed to open up shops after the walkway was refurbished. Many of the shops have been run by the same family for generations.</div><div><br></div> www.youtube.com After you walk under Kaminarimon Gate there is a 200 meter stretch of shops along ‘Nakamise-dori’ (the middle road of shops). From the late 1600s, people vis...
<div>Hozomon 'Treasure House Gate' 宝蔵門 (Sensoji Temple Complex) | Tokyo, Japan</div><div><br></div><div>Further down Nakamisedori (the ‘inner market road’) you’ll arrive at Hozomon, the ‘Treasure House Gate’ that leads to Sensoji Temple. This gate houses the treasures of Sensoji. The treasures are comprised of written Buddhist sutras from hundreds of years past. Some of them are designated as Japanese National Treasures, and are off limits to the public. (in particular, the Issai-kyo scriptures) Hozomon also has two Buddhist guardian deity statues - called ‘nio’ - which is why the gate was originally called ‘Niomon Gate’ (仁王門) and sometimes still is. The huge pair of waraji (straw sandals) are believed to belong to Nio. There are also three lanterns that adorn the gate, which leads the way to the main temple called ‘Kannondo’ (観音堂).</div> www.youtube.com Hozomon Gate, or the ‘Treasure House Gate’, leads to Sensoji Temple. This gate houses the treasures of Sensoji, comprised of written Buddhist sutras from hun...
<div>Sensoji Temple 浅草寺 &amp; Goju-no-To Pagoda 五重塔 (Sensoji Temple Complex) | Tokyo, Japan</div><div><br></div><div>On the grounds is a 5-story pagoda. They are common at Buddhist temples and are supposed to contain the ashes of the Buddha. The pagoda at Sensoji is equal to an 18-story building in height, the second tallest in Japan. It was built in 942. Without special permission entry is strictly off-limits. Inside statues of Kannon and tablets are housed. The ashes kept at the top are said to have come from Sri Lanka, officially inherited from the Isurumuniya temple there. (pagodas are also called ‘stupa’ and originally dome-shaped but changed to the tower-shape during the times when Buddhism was introduced to China.) Labelled as one of the “Four Edo Pagodas”, it was declared a National Treasure of Japan in 1911, but destroyed in the Second World War and since rebuilt.</div><div><br></div><div>The ashes kept at the top of Sensoji's Goju-no-To are said to have come from Sri Lanka, officially inherited from the Isurumuniya temple there. (pagodas are also called ‘stupa’ and originally dome-shaped but changed to the tower-shape during the times when Buddhism was introduced to China.) The temple was built by King Devanampiya Tissa (307 BC to 267 BC), ruler of the ancient Sri Lankan capital of Anuradhapura.</div> www.youtube.com Sensoji Temple, also called Kinryu-zan (金龍山), is the oldest and one of the most important religious sites in the city of Tokyo, with the first iteration of t...
<div>Sensoji Temple 浅草寺 &amp; Goju-no-To Pagoda 五重塔 (Sensoji Temple Complex) | Tokyo, Japan</div><div><br></div><div>Sensoji Temple, also called Kinryu-zan (金龍山), is the oldest and one of the most important religious sites in the city of Tokyo, with the first iteration of the temple being founded in 645 Common Era. It is dedicated to Kannon Bosatsu, the Goddess of Mercy (or compassion). As the legend tells, two brothers - Hinokuma Hamanari and Hinokura Hamanari - who were purportedly fishing in the nearby Sumidagawa River dredged a statuette of Kannon. They brought the statute to the local landowning village leader, Hajino Nakamoto, and he gave a sermon about the Buddha. They then converted and preached for their entire lives. The first small temple was established in 628 CE, converted from the home of the village leader. In 942, during the Heian Period, Taira no Kinmasa, the Governor of Awa Province prayed at Sensoji to be appointed to the Governor of Musashi Province (in the Kanto area where Toyo is located). When successful, he demonstrated his appreciation by building Sensoji to thank the temple. Many military commanders prayed here.</div><div><br></div><div>In the early 1600s, the temple was designated as the official temple of the Tokugawa Clan, the shogunate that ruled for nearly the next 250 years. After walking through Nakamise-dori, and under Hozomon Gate (Treasure-House Gate), you’ll find a ‘chozuya’ (or ‘temizuya’ 手水舎) purification area for you to cleanse yourself before entering the temple. There is also a ‘jokoro’ - a large incense burner where you can bath yourself in the smoke, which purportedly heals wounds faster. At the temple, there is an inner shrine called Nishinomiya Inari Shrine, with Shinto torii gates identifying it as sacred ground. This tour is about the history of the Sensoji Temple comp</div> www.youtube.com Sensoji Temple, also called Kinryu-zan (金龍山), is the oldest and one of the most important religious sites in the city of Tokyo, with the first iteration of t...
<div>Asakusa Shrine 浅草神社 (Sensoji Temple Complex) | Tokyo, Japan</div><div><br></div><div>Interestingly, on the Sensoji (Buddhist) temple complex grounds you’ll find the (Shinto) Asakusa Shrine, dedicated to the men who found the statuette of Kannon and established the temple. In 1649, Tokugawa Iemitsu commissioned its construction. This shrine is one of the oldest and most famous in Tokyo. The shrine honours three men recognized as the founders of the temple. In 628, two brothers - Hinokuma Hamanari and Hinokura Hamanari - who were purportedly fishing in the nearby Sumidagawa River dredged a statuette of Kannon. They brought the statute to the local landowning village leader, Hajino Nakamoto, and he gave a sermon about the Buddha. They then converted and preached for their entire lives. It’s interesting that they would be enshrined in the Shinto style. (which shows that by the time Shinto and Buddhism were living in relative harmony. The landowner converted his house as a dedication to Kannon in the form of a small temple that eventually become Sensoji. Asakusa Shrine is dedicated to the three men. In the early 1600s, the temple was designated as the official temple of the Tokugawa Clan, the shogunate that ruled for nearly the next 250 years. After walking through Nakamise-dori, and under Hozomon Gate (Treasure-House Gate), you’ll find a ‘chozuya’ (or ‘temizuya’ 手水舎) purification area for you to cleanse yourself before entering the temple. There is also a ‘jokoro’ - a large incense burner where you can bath yourself in the smoke, which purportedly heals wounds faster. At the temple, there is an inner shrine called Nishinomiya Inari Shrine, with Shinto torii gates identifying it as sacred ground. This tour is about the history of the Sensoji Temple complex and coexist</div> www.youtube.com Interestingly, on the Sensoji (Buddhist) temple complex grounds you’ll find the (Shinto) Asakusa Shrine, dedicated to the men who found the statuette of Kann...
<div>The Sumidagawa River 隅田川</div>

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