The first 'Globe' was built by the company that Shakespeare was in, the 'Lord Chamberlain’s Men'. http://www.shakespearesglobe.com
www.youtube.com The Comedy of Errors: 'Locked Out' | Shakespeare's Globe | Rent or Buy on Globe Player - YouTube
Probably the first Shakespeare play to be performed at the Globe was Julius Caesar, in 1599 http://www.shakespearesglobe.com
www.youtube.com Titus Andronicus now available on DVD - YouTube
www.youtube.com Julius Caesar: 'Friends, Romans, Countrymen' | Shakespeare's Globe | Rent or Buy on Globe Player - YouTube
The original Globe opened in 1599 and proved to be a huge success. http://www.shakespearesglobe.com
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The gilded ribs of the Heavens divide the canopy into panels. The painted sky is adorned with sun, moon, signs of the zodiac and the central panel hides a trapdoor. © Pete Le May
The Globe's pillars, which hold up the roof over the stage, are 28ft high and are made from two oak trees, painted to look like marble. © Pete Le May
The original Globe opened in 1599, built using the demolished remains of James Burbage’s old ‘Theatre’. © Peter Dazeley
Globe under construction Twenty huge oak timbers rise 32 feet in the air to form the main frame of the new Globe Theatre. shakespearesglobe.com
The new Globe is the first building in London to have a thatched roof since the Great Fire of 1666. © Pawel Libera
Did you know throughout the summer, the Globe offers midnight matinee performances under the stars. © John Wildgoose
The Actor's View The stage columns, like the Globe itself, are actually polygonal rather than perfectly round. Due to the sixteenth-century methods used in their construction, each column is a 64-sided shape. © Peter Dazeley
Made of green oak, timber and plaster, the Globe is a living building which moves with the seasons, never completely still. © Pete Le May
On 29 June 1613, during a performance of Henry VIII, a piece of wadding from a stage cannon set fire to the thatched roof, burning the Globe to the ground. © Pete Le May
The jigs which ended each performance were normally written by the company clown. © John Haynes
Plays at the Globe would start at 2pm and conclude with a jig or song-and-dance act at about 5pm. © Marc Brenner
People standing in the yard were known as Groundlings – a groundling is a type of fish, known for lurking at the bottom of rivers. In Shakespeare’s time, it cost a penny to stand in the yard. © Gary Calton

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