Aboard the CCGS Amundsen
<h3><b>TEDx David Barber, Changing sea ice</b></h3><b>David Barber</b>, an Arctic researcher at the University of Manitoba, addresses the dramatic changes in sea ice conditions he has seen in Canada’s northern waters. Barber is one of the original scientists who pioneered the <i>Amundsen</i>’s<i> </i>role as a research icebreaker. youtu.be This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. It is now well known that sea ice in the Arctic has changed in both...
<h3><b>Digging up the past with the CASQ gravity core</b></h3>Aboard the CCGS <i>Amundsen</i>, French paleoceanographer <b>Guillaume Massé</b> studies the changing conditions of the Arctic’s sea ice throughout history. He and his colleagues do this by scooping up sediment samples from the ocean floor with a rectangular, metal box — their version of a sandbox pail — and analyzing the organic chemicals found within. youtu.be Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
<h3><b>Image gallery:</b></h3><h3><b>Studying water conditions with oceanographic mooring instrumentation</b></h3><b>Shawn Meredyk</b>, a mooring instrumentation professional at ArcticNet, studies changes in the Beaufort Sea’s behaviour due to climate change. He deploys a line of moorings off the port side of the CCGS <i>Amundsen</i>. The moorings are suspended in a straight line by neon orange floats that house electronic instruments to collect data about temperature, salinity, conductivity and the speed of currents up to 300 metres below the surface. www.flickr.com Shawn Meredyk, a mooring instrumentation professional at ArcticNet, studies changes in the Beaufort Sea’s behaviour due to climate change. He deploys a line of moorings off the port side of the CCGS Amundsen. The moorings are suspended in a straight line by neon orange floats that house electronic instruments to collect data about temperature, salinity, conductivity and the speed of currents up to 300 metres below the surface. -- Spécialiste des instruments de mouillage chez ArcticNet, Shawn Meredyk étudie les transformations marines causées par les changements climatiques. Pour ce faire, il déploie des mouillages à partir du NGCC Amundsen dans la mer de Beaufort. Les mouillages sont suspendus en ligne droite à des bouées orange, munies d’instruments électroniques pour recueillir des données sur la température, la salinité, la conductivité et la vitesse des courants jusqu’à 300 mètres de la surface.
<h3><b>Mapping the sea floor with the</b><b> </b><b>multibeam echosounder and the </b><b>Moving Vessel Profiler</b></h3><b>Jean-Guy Nistad</b> and <b>Gabriel Joyal </b>make up the CCGS <i>Amundsen</i>&apos;s mapping team. They use a Moving Vessel Profiler (MVP) to measure different kinds of data such as speed of sound, temperature and dissolved oxygen content in the water. They also use a multibeam echosounder to create vivid 3-D maps of the Arctic sea floor. youtu.be Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
<h3><b>Deep-sea exploring with the Remotely Operated Vehicle </b></h3>The Sub-Atlantic SuperMohawk ROV is a submersible robot that serves as marine scientists&apos; eyes and arms in deep Arctic waters. The ROV is part of the CCGS <i>Amundsen</i>&apos;s impressive research infrastructure arsenal. It is lowered into the water through the ship&apos;s moon pool, a large, square opening in the floor of the vessel that acts like an elevator to the sea. youtu.be Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
<h3><b>Image gallery:</b></h3><h3><b>Catching krill with the Bioness multi-net sampler</b></h3><b>Cyril Aubry</b>, a research associate at Université Laval, lowers a Bioness multi-net sampler into the sea from the deck of the CCGS <i>Amundsen</i>. The sampler’s nets fan out to catch fish larvae and larger zooplankton, such as krill, which form the foundation of the aquatic food chain. Monitoring changes to larval fish and krill populations helps scientists forecast food supply fluctuations for larger animals such as seals, sea birds, whales and polar bears. www.flickr.com Cyril Aubry, a research associate at Université Laval, lowers a Bioness multi-net sampler into the sea from the deck of the CCGS Amundsen. The sampler’s nets fan out to catch fish larvae and larger zooplankton, such as krill, which form the foundation of the aquatic food chain. Monitoring changes to larval fish and krill populations helps scientists forecast food supply fluctuations for larger animals such as seals, sea birds, whales and polar bears. -- Associé de recherche à l’Université Laval, Cyril Aubry abaisse un échantillonneur multi-filets Bioness du pont du NGCC Amundsen dans la mer pour attraper des larves de poisson et des espèces plus grosses de zooplancton, comme des crustacés euphausiacés, qui forment la fondation de la chaîne alimentaire aquatique. L’examen des changements aux larves de poisson et aux populations de crustacés euphausiacés aide les scientifiques à prévoir les fluctuations dans l’approvisionnement alimentaires des plus gros animaux comme les phoques, les oiseaux de mer, les baleines et les ours polaires.
<b></b><h3><b>READ: Platform Outcome Measurement Study of the CCGS <i>Amundsen</i></b><i><b> - </b></i><b>Expert panel report</b></h3>In November 2014, four polar and ocean scientists boarded the CCGS <i>Amundsen </i>to evaluate its activities and achievements using the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s unique Platform Outcome Measurement Study system. www.innovation.ca
<h3><b>Destination CCGS <i>Amundsen</i>: A meeting place for Arctic researchers from around the world</b></h3>The CCGS <i>Amundsen</i>’s conversion from coast guard ship to Arctic research vessel has brought marine scientists from around the world to Canada. Hear from some of the researchers aboard this unique ship who have travelled a long way to be a part of the <i>Amundsen</i> experience.<b></b> youtu.be Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
<h3><b>Sampling the sea with the conductivity, temperature and depth CTD-Rosette</b></h3><b>Line Bourdages</b>, a PhD student in McGill University’s Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, collects ocean water samples to understand the effects of climate change in the Arctic. She is one of many researchers who use the CTD-Rosette aboard the CCGS <i>Amundsen</i>. youtu.be Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
<b>Main image:</b> Laurel McFadden / ArcticNet
<h3><b>EXPLORE: The CCGS </b><i><b>Amundsen</b></i><b>&apos;s 2014 journey around the Canadian Arctic</b></h3>Since 2003, the CCGS <i>Amundsen </i>has left its home port of Quebec City to journey to the Canadian Arctic where researchers use the vessel’s labs and workspaces to conduct world-class polar research. youtu.be Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
<h3><b>READ: Key findings of the Expert Panel</b></h3>The key findings of the Expert Panel for the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s <i>Platform outcome measurement study</i> of the Canadian Research Icebreaker, the CCGS <i>Amundsen.</i> www.flickr.com The key findings of the Expert Panel for the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s Platform outcome measurement study of the Canadian Research Icebreaker, the CCGS Amundsen. Find out more about the Canada Foundation for Innovation's Platform outcome measurement study of the Canadian Research Icebreaker, the CCGS Amundsen
<b></b><h3><b>BROWSE: By the numbers: the Canadian Research Icebreaker CCGS </b><i><b>Amundsen</b></i></h3><i><b></b></i> www.flickr.com Explore Innovation.ca's photos on Flickr. Innovation.ca has uploaded 1016 photos to Flickr.
<h3><b>Collecting fish samples with the beam trawl</b></h3><b>Marianne Falardeau</b>, a PhD student in natural resource sciences at McGill University, uses the beam trawl, a large fishing net, to catch fish for her research, which looks at the way energy flows between species in the Arctic food web. <b></b> youtu.be Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
<h3><b>The CCGS <i>Amundsen</i>: the origin story</b></h3><b>Louis Fortier</b>, Director of ArcticNet and Canada Research Chair on the Response of Arctic Marine Ecosystems to Climate Change at the Université Laval, talks about the origin of the CCGS <i>Amundsen</i> and his journey to transforming a Canadian Coast Guard ship bound for the scrapyards into what is now Canada&apos;s most innovative Arctic science research platform. youtu.be Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
<h3><b>READ: Inuit Health Survey</b></h3>In 2007-2008, a research team boarded the CCGS <i>Amundsen</i> to conduct the year-long Inuit Health Survey. They gathered data on the living conditions, challenges and health of more than 2,500 Inuit living in 36 communities in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Nunavut and Nunatsiavut. The role of the <i>Amundsen</i>, along with a summary of the research results from Nunavut, was published in Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.’s 2013 Annual Report on the State of Inuit Culture and Society. www.tunngavik.com
<b></b><h3><b>READ: Research aboard the CCGS <i>Amundsen </i>is supported by Canada’s vibrant research funding ecosystem</b><b></b></h3>Find out more about the Canadian research funding agencies that have helped bring the CCGS <i>Amundsen</i> to life and supported its mission in the Arctic. www.innovation.ca
www.innovation.ca The Canada Foundation for Innovation invests in state-of-the-art facilities and equipment in Canada’s research institutions. The CFI helps to attract and retain top talent, to train the next generation of researchers and to support world-class research that strengthens the economy and improves the quality of life for all Canadians.

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