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Havana with landmarks from 1798 map by José del Rio & others

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Cathedral
Treasury
Convent of Santo Domingo
Government Palace
Royal Post Ofice
Castillo de la Real Fuerza
Wharf and Customs The wharf at the very entrance to the bay was the "official entry and exit place for passengers and products arriving on the island."[1] [1] Sherry Johnson, The Social Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Cuba, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press), 22.
Plaza of San Francisco
Church and Convent of San Francisco
Navy Accounting Office
Wharf of the Derrick The wharf, also known as "Accounting," was constructed for the use of the Royal Tobacco Company.
Derrick The wheel of the derrick, also known as "la machina," was reconstructed after the British invasion in 1762. The derrick loaded barrels of tobacco onto nearby ships.[1] It was also the primary wharf used by the Royal Tobacco Company. [1] Sherry Johnson, The Social Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Cuba, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press), 29.
House of the General Commanders of the Navy
Port and Wharf of La Luz The wharf "was used by the rural folk from across the bay."[1] [1] Sherry Johnson, The Social Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Cuba, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press), 22.
Church/Hospital of Paula The hospital, rebuilt in 1748, served female patients. It had separate floors for white and black patients.[1] [1] Sherry Johnson, The Social Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Cuba, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press), 32.
New Plaza
Convent of San Agustin
Convent of Santa Clara
Church of Espiritu Santo Dating from the 1630s (considered the oldest in the city), the Church was the "poorest of the city's parishes."[1] It catered to the "11,000 impoverished souls who were packed tightly within the confines of the Barrio de Campeche."[2] [1] Sherry Johnson, The Social Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Cuba, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press), 21. [2] Ibid.
Convent of La Merced
Convent of San Juan de Dios/Hospital de San Juan de Dios The hospital had been founded in the 16th century as a military hospital.[1] [1] Sherry Johnson, The Social Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Cuba, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press), 32.
Convent of the Capuchins
Convent of the Carmelitas Descalzas
Convent/Hospital of Belén The hospital, serving men, was the most well endowed in the city thanks to a merchant who left funds for its maintenance in 1718.[1] [1] Sherry Johnson, The Social Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Cuba, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press), 32.
Convent of the Nuns of Santa Catalina
Church of San Isidro
Door of Monserrate
Church of San Angel Established in 1693, "Santo Angel's population contained many military members housed in the Cuartel de Artilleria or its successor, constructed in 1789, the Cuartel de las Milicias." [1] [1] Sherry Johnson, The Social Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Cuba, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press), 21.
Door and Battery of the Punta
Door and Battery of San Telmo
Church of Santo Cristo, "one of the busiest parishes in terms of pedestrian foot traffic moving in and out of the city" because of its proximity to the Door of La Tierra. [1] [1] Sherry Johnson, The Social Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Cuba, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press), 21.
Door of la Tierra, primary gate in the city's walls.
New Door
Slave Barracks (former Military Barracks)
Plaza Mayor (now, Plaza de Armas)
Royal Shipyard "The city's importance, and that of its shipyard, 'the pride of Havana,' had accelerated in the 1740s when the Real Compañía accepted the financial responsibility to build ships for the Royal Navy."[1] [1] Sherry Johnson, The Social Transformation of Eighteenth-Century Cuba, (Gainesville: University of Florida Press), 27.
Military Parade Ground The military ground served as a buffer between urban and rural areas, although neighborhoods started to proliferate in this area by the mid-18th century.
Lucumí Cabildo When founded in 1728, the cabildo (mutual aid association) for Yoruba-identified enslaved and free people of color, was located on a plaza in front of the Church of San Cristo. It was relocated in the 1790s.[1] [1] Matt D. Childs, “Re-Creating African Ethnic Identities in Cuba,” in The Black Urban Atlantic in the Age of the Slave Trade, ed. Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, Matt D. Childs, and James Sidbury (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), 91.<br />