This is astutely accurate. Not "talking with" or "listening to"--"TALKING TO!" You're good at this.
The phrase, &quot;Dentists make outstanding state superintendents&quot; would, in fact, <b>be further from the truth.</b>
Just because they are numbers doesn&apos;t mean the data are impartial. SLO and OAM values will be easily manipulated by educators. Just wait and see.
&quot;Carefully designed?&quot; You mean like New Coke, hydrogen filled blimps, and Ford Pintos? You also forgot to mention what happens to great teachers as a result of TLE. They leave.
As a school leader, I can share with you how I make informed decisions. I walk around and talk &quot;with&quot; people. I ask questions and keep an open mind. I read research and study best practices. I also monitor key measures aligned with our district&apos;s goals and strategic objectives. Works for me. You ought to try it in your next job.
How would parents know if their school is any good? Oh, I don&apos;t know. How about ask their kids and maybe visit the school? Also, since the TLE data is not accessable to parents, will the mere knowledge that data &quot;exists&quot; be enough to assure them?
Considering the fact that major research organizations like the American Statistics Association (ASA) claim that value added models can only show correlation, not causation, this is just a lie. Teachers in high poverty districts will always be at a disadvantage when tests are used as the primary measure. VAM&apos;s do not account for system-related factors. READ the research, please!!
How can TLE scores already be improving in these schools without the use of quantitative data? For now, TLE is based completely on qualitative and subjective classroom observations.
You act like teachers were completely oblivious to the use of assessments to guide effective instruction prior to TLE and A-F. Teachers invented assessments. It&apos;s almost like you haven&apos;t worked in a school in thirty years. Oh, wait...
Yeah, ask teachers how much &quot;clarity&quot; TLE has brought to the evaluation process. Bad data is worse than no data at all. Nothing will replace authentic conversations with school leaders and meaningful collaboration with colleagues as tools for teacher growth.
We all hope this is your last official newsletter. By the way, I think &quot;importance&quot; should be capitalized. You know, titles.

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