ENTRANCE FOR THOSE POTENTIALLY INFECTED AND TRIAGE Sick people thought to be suffering from Ebola are brought into the triage area. They are examined by medical personnel who wear protective clothing and are divided into two groups, based on the probability of them actually having Ebola. © Martin Zinggl cdn.thinglink.me
ENTRANCE FOR THOSE SUFFERING FROM EBOLA When patients arrive who are definitely known to have Ebola, they go directly to the ward for Ebola patients, without going through triage. © Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos cdn.thinglink.me
DRESSING ROOM Staff who have to enter the high-risk zone of the Ebola centre must first put on protective clothing. A colleague assists them, to make sure that everything is done correctly. Staff always go inside at least in pairs, to be able to check on and assist each other. © P.K. Lee/MSF media.msf.org
UNDRESSING ROOM Staff coming out again are often physically and emotionally exhausted. However, they have to remove their protective clothing slowly and meticulously otherwise there is a risk of infection. Once again, colleagues are present to prevent mistakes being made. © Morgana Wingard cdn.thinglink.me
WARD - PATIENTS WITH A LOW PROBABILITY OF EBOLA Depending on the lab where the blood tests are done, patients have to wait several hours or days to know whether they actually have Ebola or not. They spend this time in the ward with other patients in the same situation. They are isolated from those who are probably or definitely infected, so that they are exposed to the lowest possible risk of infection while in the hospital itself. © Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos cdn.thinglink.me
WARD - PATIENTS WITH A HIGH PROBABILITY OF EBOLA If the medical staff suspect that someone has Ebola, based on the symptoms, the patient stays in the ward with those who have a high probability of being infected. They are only transferred to the ward with patients who definitely have Ebola if a blood test confirms the Ebola diagnosis. © Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos cdn.thinglink.me
WARD - PATIENTS WITH EBOLA Patients whose blood test confirmed that they are suffering from Ebola stay in this ward until they die or recover. There is no cure for Ebola; our staff can only provide supportive care. Good care increases the chances of survival, but because most centres are inundated and are unable to cope with the number of patients, it is difficult to provide that care. © Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos cdn.thinglink.me
NETWORK OF MARKED ROUTES Everyone follows a strict path along these marked routes. This reduces the risk of the virus spreading within the Ebola centre. Neither patients nor staff are allowed to go from a zone with a high infection risk to a lower-risk zone, and at crucial intersections there are footbaths containing disinfectant. Each room must be quickly and easily accessible because staff can only stay inside briefly and as a consequence have no time to lose. © Sam Taylor/MSF cdn.thinglink.me
VISITORS' AREA Patients who feel strong enough can walk outside. There is a visitors' room, so that patients can talk to relatives and friends. The double separation makes touching impossible which means visitors cannot be infected. © P.K. Lee/MSF cdn.thinglink.me
VISITORS' AREA Patients who feel strong enough can walk outside. There is a visitors' room, so that patients can talk to relatives and friends. The double separation makes touching impossible which means visitors cannot be infected. © Morgana Wingard cdn.thinglink.me
VISITORS' AREA Patients who feel strong enough can walk outside. There is a visitors' room, so that patients can talk to relatives and friends. The double separation makes touching impossible which means visitors cannot be infected. © Morgana Wingard cdn.thinglink.me
PATIENTS' EXIT If the blood test shows that a patient does not have Ebola, they leave the Ebola centre immediately, without going through any other departments. Those who have recovered also leave the centre immediately. Before leaving, the discharged patient must wash and disinfect themselves thoroughly and receive new clothes. © Morgana Wingard cdn.thinglink.me
MORTUARY Mortality is very high in most Ebola centres. Dead patients are transferred to the mortuary. This is located outside the clinic itself, but inside the double fence, because the bodies remain highly infectious. © Amandine Colin/MSF cdn.thinglink.me
Decontamination shower
Decontamination shower
Decontamination shower
Shower and toilet reserved for patients
Shower and toilet reserved for patients
Shower and toilet reserved for patients
Mortuary
Between patients, medical staff rinse gloves with a solution of chlorinated water (0.5% ) to avoid cross contamination between patients.
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Follow MSF UK on Twitter twitter.com The latest Tweets from MSF UK (@MSF_uk). Médecins Sans Frontières: providing medical care where it's needed most since 1971. Independent. Neutral. Impartial. London
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Take a look at our interactive guide of the wider Ebola treatment centre. www.thinglink.com TOUCH this image to discover its story. Image tagging powered by ThingLink

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