Log in with Facebook Log in
Log in

Not registered? Sign up for free »

Reading the Spine of a Post

×
Visit dogtrax.edublogs.org Loading..

Related images

What is this? A close reading of a post about a stolen poem as part of the #rhizo14 course. I used a tool called mesostomatic (originally conceived by composer John Cage as a version of an acrostic poem). The tool automatically takes text and configures it into amesostomatic writing. dogtrax.edublogs.org Kevin's Meandering Mind | A Stolen Poem Finds Its Way Home
Make yer own ... mesostics.sas.upenn.edu
I gave the phrase "stolen poem" to the engine, which is why those words are the spine. The text is from a post about a poem I asked people to steal and remix.
I'm glad that "learning" got into the mix here. The "steal this poem" idea is all about pushing boundaries of digital writing, and who owns what and when is "cheating learning" -- as Dave put it in the Rhizo14 group.
These lines get to the heart of the exploration of the post -- what is rhizomatic learning and how do we represent that in a digital space?
"Ideas Turning" would be a good title for this kind of learning. And the last lines here - "actually take, know" -- if we added the comma would be apt, too. We were taking something we knew -- a poem -- and remixing it across spaces. That is was my own poem originally was all the more interesting for me.
So happy to see "invitation" here, too, since that was it was. An open invite to remix. The invitation could have fallen on deaf ears, but it didn't. The concept of stealing/remixing took root, and (as the the blog post that became the text of this mesostomatic was titled) the poem came home.