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Nervous dispatches about the Common Core

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www.aei-ideas.org Note: this is part 5 of a 10-part series on the Common Core. For part 4, see here. I want to devote two installments of this series to governance of the Common Core, something that I think can make or break it moving forward. As part of our Common Core research conference, we invited Dane [...]
www.aei-ideas.org On Friday, I raised big picture issues of politics related to governance of the Common Core standards. Today, I want to talk nuts and bolts. The Common Core needs a governing body if it is going to live up to its billing. It’s as simple as that. The Common Core was designed to be an [...]
www.aei-ideas.org This is part 7 in an ongoing series, see yesterday’s post here. Those in the know are telling us that the new, more rigorous Common Core standards, and the assessments aligned to them, will lead to a drop in scores on standardized exams when they are brought online. This is almost axiomatic. If you raise [...]
www.aei-ideas.org One of the things that drew me to the Common Core initially was its great potential as a platform to develop new, cool technologies that teachers all across the country could use to improve their instruction. I started my career teaching in Alabama, and given the tiny market share of that state, not a lot [...]
www.aei-ideas.org This is part 9 in an ongoing series, see the whole collection here. To avoid having to weigh in on debates over the Common Core where my expertise does not lie, from time to time over the past two weeks I’ve simply granted certain arguments regarding the quality of the Common Core standards. I’m going [...]
Learn more www.aei-ideas.org As my Common Core blog series comes to a close, I’d like to go back to the beginning. Anybody who studies public policy would be well served to read Jeffrey Pressman and Aaron Wildvasky’s 1973 classic of political science Implementation. The subtitle tells you all you need to know: How great expectations in Washington are [...]